Fundamental Soil Layers New Zealand Soil Classification

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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20811
532
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"This data describes the location of the different types of soil in New Zealand using the New Zealand Soil Classification.

This data set relates to the "Soils" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website."

Layer ID 52766
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 107298
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Erosion risk North Island 2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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11757
162
Added
12 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Feb 2016.

"This data records estimated erosion risk for different areas in the North Island.

New Zealand experiences high rates of soil erosion. In the North Island, this is mostly due to the historical clearance of forest for agriculture (see also Estimated long-term soil erosion). In contrast, erosion in the South Island is mostly due to natural processes, primarily high rainfall and steep mountain slopes.
Highly erodible land comprises land at risk of landsliding, gullying, or earthflow erosion if it does not have protective woody vegetation (Dymond et al, 2006). Landsliding occurs on steep slopes where the soils do not have the support of tree roots.
Gullying and earthflow erosion can occur on all slopes, irrespective of steepness, but the land is only considered at risk if it does not have woody vegetation.
Landslide erosion is the shallow (approximately 1m) and sudden failure of soil slopes during storm rainfall. Gully erosion is massive soil erosion that begins at gully heads and expands up hillsides, over decadal time scales. Earthflow erosion is the slow downward movement (approximately 1m/year) of wet soil slopes towards waterways.

This data set relates to the "Estimated highly erodible land in the North Island" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website."

Layer ID 53177
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution 100.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

High-class land for food production - Lifestyle blocks on high-class land, by region, 2011

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5469
25
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

High-class land is the most productive land for growing food. It supports most crops across New Zealand. Expanding lifestyle blocks and urban areas reduces the availability of high-class land for commercial crop growing, and this land is unlikely to be returned to primary production. This affects our commercial food-production capacity.

Column headings:
area_kha = area of land measured in kilohectares (ie multiply by 1000 to get hectares)

This dataset relates to the "High-class land for food production" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52494
Data type Table
Row count 34
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Soil quality and land use, 1995–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

8014
94
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Soil supports the productivity of agriculture, horticulture, and forestry, and filters water to help prevent waterways from becoming contaminated. Different land uses put pressure on the land environment and can change soil quality. Soil quality is assessed under four different groups of land uses: forestry, cropping and horticulture, dairy, and dry stock by measuring the following soil properties: acidity (pH), fertility (Olsen P), organic reserves (total carbon, total nitrogen, mineralisable nitrogen), and physical status (macroporosity and bulk density). Soil scientists have identified the target range for each of these indicators, for maintaining production but with a prime focus for managing risk to the environment.

This measure reports on soil quality, by land use and soil order.

Table ID 95345
Data type Table
Row count 1179
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Highly erodible land 2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5868
26
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

The data identifies five classes of land in New Zealand at risk of erosion:

  1. high landslide risk – delivery to stream
  2. high landslide risk – non-delivery to steam
  3. moderate earthflow risk
  4. severe earthflow risk
  5. gully risk

Landslide erosion is the shallow (approximately 1m) and sudden failure of soil slopes during storm rainfall. Earthflow erosion is the slow downward movement (approximately 1m/year) of wet soil slopes towards waterways. Gully erosion is massive soil erosion that begins at gully heads and expands up hillsides over decadal time scales.

Erosion can have negative consequences on land productivity, water quality (via increased sedimentation and turbidity), the natural form of the land, and infrastructure.

New Zealand experiences high rates of soil erosion. In the North Island, this is mostly due to the historical clearance of forest for agriculture (see also Estimated long-term soil erosion). In contrast, erosion in the South Island is mostly due to natural processes, primarily high rainfall and steep mountain slopes.

It is important to identify areas of land at risk of severe erosion to inform land-use decisions and help prioritise regional soil conservation work.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99877
Data type Table
Row count 240
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Long term soil erosion North Island 2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5140
46
Added
09 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 09 Feb 2016.

"Long-term soil erosion is the average mass of soil lost per square kilometre per year (tonnes/km2/year) over a period of approximately 10 years. It is extrapolated from long-term measurements of sediment load in rivers. Extrapolation is based on mean annual rainfall, rock type, and land cover. The total sediment in rivers (tonnes/year) for a particular region is the sum of all soil erosion over the entire region (Dymond et al, 2010). Soil-erosion rates were calculated to 2012.

This data set relates to the "Estimated long-term soil erosion" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website."

Layer ID 52832
Data type Grid
Resolution 100.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Soil quality, state, 1996 - 2018

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1308
11
Updated
14 Apr 2021

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 14 Apr 2021.

DATA SOURCE: Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research; regional and district councils

[Technical report available at environment.govt.nz/publications/soil-quality-data... and environment.govt.nz/publications/soil-quality-and-...]

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

Dataset used to develop the "Soil quality and land use" indicator [available at www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/soil-quality-and-land...]

We report on seven soil properties from 1996 to 2018: pH (a measure of acidity), Olsen phosphorus (a measure of fertility), total carbon, total nitrogen, and anaerobically mineralisable nitrogen (measures of organic reserves), and macroporosity and bulk density (measures of physical status). These are assessed across nine land uses. We report the proportion of sites above, below, and within soil quality target ranges for each of the seven soil quality indicators by land use, as well as by soil order.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf. Technical report links for this dataset are environment.govt.nz/publications/soil-quality-data... and environment.govt.nz/publications/soil-quality-and-...

Table ID 105416
Data type Table
Row count 26534
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Fertilisers, nitrogen and phosphorus, applied, 2002 - 2019

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1157
9
Added
14 Apr 2021

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Apr 2021.

DATA SOURCE: Fertiliser Association of New Zealand

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

Dataset used to develop the "Fertilisers phosphorus and nitrogen applied" indicator [available at statisticsnz.shinyapps.io/farm_fertiliser_ap...]

This indicator measures the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus-based fertiliser (Urea, diammonium phosphate, superphosphate and ammonium sulphate) applied to agricultural land from 2002 to 2019 by region and dominant farm type.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 105411
Data type Table
Row count 4361
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrogen phosphorus and potassium in fertilisers Fertiliser Association 1990–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5742
7
Added
15 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Apr 2019.

Industry estimates of fertiliser nutrient consumption in New Zealand 1990–2015.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99866
Data type Table
Row count 78
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

High-class land for food production - New urban area on high-class land, by region, 1990–2008

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5528
26
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

high-class land is the most productive land for growing food. It supports most crops across New Zealand. Expanding lifestyle blocks and urban areas reduces the availability of high-class land for commercial crop growing, and this land is unlikely to be returned to primary production. This affects our commercial food-production capacity.

Column headings:
area_kha = area of land measured in kilohectares (ie multiply by 1000 to get hectares)

This dataset relates to the "High-class land for food production" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52493
Data type Table
Row count 34
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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