Average annual PED, 2015/16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1094
6
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. As our climate changes, increasing temperatures and rainfall pattern changes are expected to increase PED, and the frequency and intensity of drought, particularly in currently drought-prone regions.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89486
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual PED, 2014/15

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2219
8
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. As our climate changes, increasing temperatures and rainfall pattern changes are expected to increase PED, and the frequency and intensity of drought, particularly in currently drought-prone regions.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89485
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual PED, 2013/14

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1991
2
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. As our climate changes, increasing temperatures and rainfall pattern changes are expected to increase PED, and the frequency and intensity of drought, particularly in currently drought-prone regions.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89484
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Anomaly PED, 2013/14–2015/16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2050
2
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. As our climate changes, increasing temperatures and rainfall pattern changes are expected to increase PED, and the frequency and intensity of drought, particularly in currently drought-prone regions.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89483
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual sunshine hours, 2015

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1944
7
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Sunshine is essential for our mental and physical well-being and plant growth. It is also important for tourism and recreation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89448
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Percent of normal sunshine hours, 2014–16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

635
2
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Sunshine is essential for our mental and physical well-being and plant growth. It is also important for tourism and recreation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89446
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual sunshine hours, 2014

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1829
5
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Sunshine is essential for our mental and physical well-being and plant growth. It is also important for tourism and recreation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89447
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual sunshine hours, 2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3139
25
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Sunshine is essential for our mental and physical well-being and plant growth. It is also important for tourism and recreation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89449
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in peak UV index value, 1981–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2148
5
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Trends in daily peak UV index values at Invercargill, Lauder (Otago region), Christchurch, Paraparaumu (Wellington region), and Leigh (Auckland region). The strength of UV light is expressed as a solar UV index, starting from 0 (no UV) to 11+ (extreme).
Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light helps our bodies make vitamin D, which we need for healthy bones and muscles. However, too much exposure to UV light can cause skin cancer. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, and monitoring UV levels helps us understand the occurrence of skin cancer.
Ozone in the upper atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s UV light, protecting us from harmful levels. The amount of UV radiation reaching the ground varies in relation to changes in the atmospheric ozone concentrations. The Antarctic ozone hole lies well to the south of New Zealand and does not have a large effect on New Zealand’s ozone concentrations.
The trend was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89469
Data type Table
Row count 5
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Monthly average peak UV index value, 1981–2017

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1898
19
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Monthly average peak UV index values at Invercargill, Lauder (Otago region), Christchurch, Paraparaumu (Wellington region), and Leigh (Auckland region). The strength of UV light is expressed as a solar UV index, starting from 0 (no UV) to 11+ (extreme).
Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light helps our bodies make vitamin D, which we need for healthy bones and muscles. However, too much exposure to UV light can cause skin cancer. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, and monitoring UV levels helps us understand the occurrence of skin cancer.
Ozone in the upper atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s UV light, protecting us from harmful levels. The amount of UV radiation reaching the ground varies in relation to changes in the atmospheric ozone concentrations. The Antarctic ozone hole lies well to the south of New Zealand and does not have a large effect on New Zealand’s ozone concentrations.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89467
Data type Table
Row count 65
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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