BOMEC_15_Class_region

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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19052
65
Updated
03 Jul 2018

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 03 Jul 2018.

The 15 class Benthic-Optimised Marine Environment Classification (BOMEC). The BOMEC divides the benthic environment into ecosystem types. These are grouped into three inshore groups, three continental shelf groups, and nine deeper-water groups. Each group represents areas with similar environmental variables, such as depth, temperature, salinity, and suspended sediment. The classification system considers the distributions of eight benthic taxonomic groups: asteroids, bryozoans, benthic foraminiferans, octocorals, polychaetes, matrix-forming scleratinian corals, sponges, and benthic fish.

Layer ID 52748
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 15
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bycatch of protected species - Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin entanglements (1921–2008)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5636
15
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

The Hector’s and Māui’s dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. They are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui’s dolphin is nationally critical. Reporting incidental dolphin deaths from fishing helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of protected species: Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52499
Data type Table
Row count 25
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bycatch of protected species: Hector’s and Māui dolphins

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2443
18
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

The South Island Hector’s and Māui dolphins are among the world’s smallest marine dolphins. Both are subspecies of the Hector’s dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. These coastal dolphins are endemic to New Zealand, which means that they are not found anywhere else. The Māui dolphin is found in the inshore waters of the west coast of the North Island, most often from Maunganui Bluff, north of Dargaville, to New Plymouth. The South Island Hector’s dolphin (hereafter referred to as ‘Hector’s dolphin’) is mostly found in the inshore waters around the South Island. Both subspecies are threatened with extinction: Hector’s dolphins have a population estimated at 15,000 and are classified as nationally vulnerable, while Māui dolphins have a population estimated at 63 individuals over one year old and are classified as nationally critical (Baker et al, 2019; MacKenzie & Clement, 2016; Baker et al, 2016).

Dolphins can become entangled in fishing gear used by both commercial and recreational fishers, with set nets posing a particularly high risk. The accidental capture of marine life in fishing gear is typically referred to as bycatch. Reporting the causes of death of protected species and specifically identifying the number of animals killed as a result of fishing activities helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.

DOC’s Hector’s and Māui dolphin incident database 1921-2018 provides data on reported deaths of Hector’s and Māui dolphins.

This indicator measures the number of reported Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths from entanglement, categorised by type of fishing gear where possible, since 1998. The number of entanglements is compared to the total number of reported deaths.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 103967
Data type Table
Row count 337
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

CAIT Country greenhouse gas emissions trends, 1990–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5784
4
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Data compiled are obtained from government reporting and complemented by a variety of non-governmental data sources.
The trend was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89426
Data type Table
Row count 2
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

CAIT Country greenhouse gas emissions, 1990–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5807
11
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Emissions data are from the Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) version 2.0 produced by the World Resources Institute (WRI). WRI compiles country-level emissions data from governmental sources, complemented by non-governmental sources “based on criteria such as completeness and relative accuracy and country datasets are produced by applying a consistent methodology.” For detailed information see World Resources Institute (2015).
Data compiled are obtained from government reporting and complemented by a variety of non-governmental data sources.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89443
Data type Table
Row count 90240
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Campylobacteriosis, cryptosporidiosis, and salmonellosis notifications, 1997–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5659
3
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Bacteria and parasites are influenced by climate variables, and infection rates may increase in response to climate change and rising temperatures. Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, and Salmonella are three such organisms that can contaminate our food and water, leading to serious illness. Monitoring the incidence rates of illnesses can help us assess the health risks related to climate change and better prepare for disease outbreaks.
The numbers of notified cases of infection are sourced from EpiSurv, New Zealand’s national notifiable disease surveillance system. Various factors influence disease notification, and therefore the calculation of notifiable disease rates. For example, people are less likely to consult a medical practitioner when an illness is not severe (ESR, 2016a). The number of notified cases vary greatly from year to year due to New Zealand’s small population and low number of cases for some diseases (Environmental Science and Research, 2016). The August 2016 Camplylobacter outbreak in Havelock provides an example of this variation (ESR, 2016b).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89386
Data type Table
Row count 816
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Carbon dioxide concentrations at Baring Head (1972–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6688
21
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Greenhouse gases (GHGS) in the atmosphere absorb heat radiating from Earth, warming the atmosphere. Emissions from human activities increase the concentrations of these gases. Increases in these gases increase ocean acidity and are extremely likely to contribute to increased global temperatures, sea levels, and glacier melt. Monitoring GHG concentrations allows us to infer long-term impacts on ocean acidity, temperature, sea level, and glaciers.
Greenhouse gases are generally well mixed around the globe. We use ‘clean air’ observations from Baring Head, near Wellington, to estimate global concentrations of the greenhouse gases – carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). These observations are made only when the air’s trajectory is from the south and away from any likely local sources of gas emissions. This gives an estimate representative of the concentrations over the Southern Ocean.
The observations tell us how the global atmosphere responds to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, and are an internationally representative measure of global concentrations. However, the Southern Hemisphere has slightly less greenhouse gas concentrations than the Northern Hemisphere, as well as a smaller seasonal variation.
Further information can be found in:
Mikaloff Fletcher, SE, & Nichol, S (2014) Measurements of Trace Gases in Well-mixed Air at Baring Head: Trends in carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/cZzREp on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Greenhouse gas concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52568
Data type Table
Row count 493
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Carbon monoxide annual trends, 2011-2020

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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308
1
Added
13 Oct 2021

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2021.

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colourless, odourless and tasteless gas. The most common sources of carbon monoxide are from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels such as fuel used by vehicles, and from wood and coal, commonly burnt in fires for home heating. Other common sources of carbon monoxide are tobacco smoke and indoor gas fires. It also occurs naturally, for example, from volcanoes and wildfires.

Carbon monoxide can affect human health by interfering with the blood’s ability to absorb and circulate oxygen and by aggravating heart conditions. It has a relatively long life in the atmosphere – about three months. This is due to the slow rate at which carbon monoxide oxidises, forming carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas). Carbon monoxide also has an important role in forming smog.

This dataset reports on the annual trends assessed for the period 2011-2020.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 106235
Data type Table
Row count 10
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Carbon monoxide concentrations and exceedances 2005–2013

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5920
32
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a gas formed by incomplete combustion of fuels, in particular from road motor vehicles and burning wood and coal for home heating. It also occurs naturally, for example, from wild fires. CO can affect human health by interfering with the blood’s ability to carry oxygen and by aggravating heart conditions.

Road motor vehicles are the main source of carbon monoxide, followed closely by wood or coal burning for home heating. These two sources contribute 50 and 43 percent respectively of the combined carbon monoxide emissions produced by home heating, on-road vehicles and industry over a year.

Column units:
- Disp_graph column: 1= displayed on graph; 0 = not displayed on graph
- Variable column: mg_m3 = milligrams per cubic metre (mg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Carbon monoxide concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52447
Data type Table
Row count 504
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Carbon monoxide concentrations at Baring Head (2000–13)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5331
6
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Greenhouse gases (GHGS) in the atmosphere absorb heat radiating from Earth, warming the atmosphere. Emissions from human activities increase the concentrations of these gases. Increases in these gases increase ocean acidity and are extremely likely to contribute to increased global temperatures, sea levels, and glacier melt. Monitoring GHG concentrations allows us to infer long-term impacts on ocean acidity, temperature, sea level, and glaciers.
Greenhouse gases are generally well mixed around the globe. We use ‘clean air’ observations from Baring Head, near Wellington, to estimate global concentrations of the greenhouse gases – carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). These observations are made only when the air’s trajectory is from the south and away from any likely local sources of gas emissions. This gives an estimate representative of the concentrations over the Southern Ocean.
The observations tell us how the global atmosphere responds to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, and are an internationally representative measure of global concentrations. However, the Southern Hemisphere has slightly less greenhouse gas concentrations than the Northern Hemisphere, as well as a smaller seasonal variation.
Further information can be found in:
Mikaloff Fletcher, SE, & Nichol, S (2014) Measurements of Trace Gases in Well-mixed Air at Baring Head: Trends in carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/cZzREp on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
Trend results can be found in the excel file "Greenhouse gas concentrations trend statistics" at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/H776gZ.
This dataset relates to the "Greenhouse gas concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52569
Data type Table
Row count 160
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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