PM2.5 concentrations, 2008–17

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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665
17
Added
15 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2018.

PM2.5 is made up of solid and liquid particles in the air with a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometres. In New Zealand, most PM2.5 in the air results from combustion (burning wood for home heating, motor-vehicle exhaust), and to a lesser extent, particles formed from reactions in the atmosphere (secondary PM) and naturally occurring sea salt.
Short- and long-term exposure to PM2.5, even at low levels, is linked to respiratory and cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of premature death, especially in vulnerable people (the young, the elderly, and people with respiratory illness). Emerging evidence points to possible links with cognitive function, neuro-development, and diabetes.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98413
Data type Table
Row count 33750
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Benzene concentrations in Hamilton, 2003–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1208
2
Added
15 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2018.

Benzene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is common in the air. Motor vehicles are benzene’s primary emission source (Guerreiro, Foltescu, & de Leeuw, 2014; Weisel, 2010) although burning wood or coal for home heating, volcanoes, and forest fires also emit benzene.
Benzene is a human carcinogen (World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe Copenhagen, 2000) that has been shown to cause leukaemia (Smith, 2010), and is associated with developmental, immune, neurological, reproductive, and respiratory problems (Bahadar, Mostafalou, & Abdollahi, 2014). Acute exposure can affect the liver and respiration (Bahadar et al, 2014).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98412
Data type Table
Row count 71
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrogen dioxide concentrations: New Zealand Transport Agency data, 2010–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1547
18
Added
16 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2018.

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a gas that is harmful to human health, ecosystems, and plants (US EPA, 2008). It can be emitted directly into the air but is often formed as a secondary pollutant when nitric oxide (NO) emissions react with other chemicals. It also contributes to the formation of secondary particulate matter (PM) and ozone, which have their own health impacts. In New Zealand, motor vehicles are the main human-made source of nitrogen oxides (NOx), the collective term for NO2 and NO. Because nitrogen dioxide concentrations are closely associated with vehicle emissions, it can be used as a proxy for other motor-vehicle pollutants such as benzene, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide.
Human exposure to high nitrogen dioxide concentrations causes inflammation of the airways and respiratory problems, particularly asthma. Nitrogen dioxide causes leaf injury in plants exposed to high levels. It also contributes to forming secondary particulate matter and ozone, which have their own health impacts.
We report on observed nitrogen dioxide concentrations from the New Zealand Transport Agency’s (NZTA) monitoring network. NZTA has comprehensive coverage across New Zealand.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98426
Data type Table
Row count 828
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ground-level ozone concentrations, Auckland, 2001–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1390
8
Added
16 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2018.

Ground-level (tropospheric) ozone (O3) exists at a natural background level but is also produced when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds from vehicle emissions, petrol fumes, industrial processes solvents, and other human-made sources react in the presence of sunlight. It is the primary component of photochemical smog.
Ozone also occurs naturally in the stratosphere, where it protects us from ultraviolet radiation – this ozone occasionally can mix downwards to ground level.
Because sunlight and warmth are required for the chemical reactions that form ground-level ozone, peak concentrations often occur in summer when daylight hours are longer and temperatures are higher. Since the precursors for ozone can travel downwind from their sources before they react with sunlight, ozone concentrations can be high many kilometres from the precursor emissions’ sources.
Exposure to high concentrations of ozone can cause respiratory health problems and is linked to cardiovascular health problems and mortality. It can also damage vegetation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98423
Data type Table
Row count 535064
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Health impacts of PM10, 2006 & 2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1491
8
Added
17 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Oct 2018.

PM10 (particulate matter less than 10 micrometres in diameter) comprises solid and liquid particles in the air. PM10 can be inhaled and the largest particles in this size fraction are deposited in the upper airways, while the smaller ones can deposit deep in the lungs. Children, the elderly, and people with existing heart or lung problems have a higher risk of health effects from PM10 exposure. Health effects include decreased lung function or heart attack, and mortality.
We report on the modelled number of premature deaths for adults (30+ years), hospitalisations, and restricted activity days for people of all ages for years 2006 and 2016 only. The model only includes impacts that result from exposure to PM10 that comes from human activities.
We focus on PM10 from human activities because these sources can be managed, unlike PM from natural sources such as sea salt.
• Premature deaths are those, often preventable, occurring before a person reaches the age they could be expected to live to.
• Hospitalisations relate to those for respiratory and cardiac illnesses (not including cases leading to premature death).
• Restricted activity days occur when symptoms are sufficient to limit usual activities such as work or study. These days aren’t shared evenly across the population – people with asthma or other respiratory conditions would likely have more restricted activity days.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98462
Data type Table
Row count 12
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Data for the procured HAPINZ health impacts model, 2006-2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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100
9
Updated
17 Oct 2018

This item was last updated on MfE Data Service on 17 Oct 2018

Data for the updated HAPINZ health impacts model, 2006-2016, procured in 2018 from Emissions Impossible

Document ID21758
File namedata-for-the-procured-hapinz-health-impacts-model-2006-2016.xlsx
TypeXLSX
Size3.35 MB

Data for Metcalfe & Sridhar (2018): 2015 NZ National air emissions inventory

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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95
8
Updated
17 Oct 2018

This item was last updated on MfE Data Service on 17 Oct 2018

Data for Metcalfe, J & Sridhar, S (2018). National air emissions inventory. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment by Emission Impossible Ltd. Wellington: Ministry for the Environment.
Report can be accessed from: www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/air/national-air-emis...

Document ID21733
File namedata-for-metcalfe-sridhar-2018-2015-nz-national-air-emissions-inventory.xlsx
TypeXLSX
Size2.93 MB

Soil quality and land use, 1995–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2307
42
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Soil supports the productivity of agriculture, horticulture, and forestry, and filters water to help prevent waterways from becoming contaminated. Different land uses put pressure on the land environment and can change soil quality. Soil quality is assessed under four different groups of land uses: forestry, cropping and horticulture, dairy, and dry stock by measuring the following soil properties: acidity (pH), fertility (Olsen P), organic reserves (total carbon, total nitrogen, mineralisable nitrogen), and physical status (macroporosity and bulk density). Soil scientists have identified the target range for each of these indicators, for maintaining production but with a prime focus for managing risk to the environment.

This measure reports on soil quality, by land use and soil order.

Table ID 95345
Data type Table
Row count 1179
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

BOMEC_15_Class_region

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4737
39
Updated
03 Jul 2018

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 03 Jul 2018.

The 15 class Benthic-Optimised Marine Environment Classification (BOMEC). The BOMEC divides the benthic environment into ecosystem types. These are grouped into three inshore groups, three continental shelf groups, and nine deeper-water groups. Each group represents areas with similar environmental variables, such as depth, temperature, salinity, and suspended sediment. The classification system considers the distributions of eight benthic taxonomic groups: asteroids, bryozoans, benthic foraminiferans, octocorals, polychaetes, matrix-forming scleratinian corals, sponges, and benthic fish.

Layer ID 52748
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 15
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Benthic_Protected_Areas

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2903
21
Updated
03 Jul 2018

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 03 Jul 2018.

From the original files MFB0174_1_region_TM and MFB0174_1_rectangle_TM.

Sourced from MPI in May 2012. Contact Alana Corney.

Layer ID 52758
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 17
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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