PM10 concentrations in OECD urban areas

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5616
20
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) is an air pollutant that causes health problems ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer. Reporting on the annual PM10 concentrations in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries helps us understand the scale of PM10 pollution in New Zealand and how we rank internationally. The OECD consists of 34 countries with similar levels of economic development.

PM10 can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of PM10 include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. PM10 also forms from reactions between gases or between gases and other particles.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Annual average PM10 concentrations in OECD countries (urban areas)" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52458
Data type Table
Row count 34
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lead concentrations 2005–13

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5508
10
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Lead is a heavy metal. Airborne sources include some industrial discharges, such as at metal smelters and the removal of lead-based paint from buildings without proper safety precautions. Lead can harm the nervous system and hearing, and impair mental development. Before 1996, when petrol became lead free, some New Zealand sites experienced elevated lead concentrations.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Lead concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52453
Data type Table
Row count 9
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Seasonality of PM10 exceedances

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6445
11
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of PM10 include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main human-made source of PM10.

PM10 is of particular concern because it is found in high concentrations in some areas and can damage health. It is associated with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer.

This dataset relates to the "Seasonality of PM10 exceedances" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52449
Data type Table
Row count 12
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality, state, 2014-18

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1550
20
Updated
11 Jun 2021

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 11 Jun 2021.

11 June 2021: A revised version of this dataset has been published to correct the terminology used to compare nitrate-nitrogen values to the 3 g/m3 guideline value. The field name has been changed from “reference_condition” to “n_n_guideline”, and values in this field will now be either “Does not exceed” or “Exceeds”, instead of “Meets” or “Does not meet”.

20 July 2020: We corrected the data about drinking water standards for E. coli and nitrate-nitrogen in the key findings for groundwater quality.

For the five-year period 2014‒2018:

  • 68 percent of 364 sites failed to meet the E.coli drinking water standards (changed from 98 percent of 145 sites failed to meet the E. coli drinking water standards)
  • 19 percent of 433 sites didn’t meet nitrate-nitrogen standards (changed from 28 percent of 403 sites failed to meet the nitrate-nitrogen drinking water standards).

This indicator measures groundwater quality in New Zealand’s aquifers and how it is changing over time, based on measurements made at monitored sites. We report on nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, chloride, conductivity and Escherichia coli (E. coli) including:

  • median values for the period 2014–18
  • nitrate-nitrogen median values compared to a guideline value of 3 grams per cubic metre (g/m3). This value is defined as a concentration that indicates groundwater has been influenced by industrialised agriculture and is highly likely to have been impacted by human activity (per Morgenstern & Daughney, 2012 and Daughney & Reeves, 2005).
  • the proportion of samples from each site that have concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen or E. coli in excess of the Maximum Acceptable Values for protection of human health (Ministry of Health, 2018).

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104569
Data type Table
Row count 14644
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

National PM10 exceedances 2006–13

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5480
18
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of PM10 include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main human-made source of PM10.

PM10 is of particular concern because it is found in high concentrations in some areas and can damage health. It is associated with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer.

Column headings:
- No_airsheds = number of airsheds

This dataset relates to the "PM10 daily concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52459
Data type Table
Row count 40
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine Reserves (2016 report)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

10764
58
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

New Zealand’s four million km2 marine environment is diverse, with a range of coastal habitats and offshore seabed environments. There are also many marine species unique to New Zealand. Marine protected areas conserve or manage some of these unique habitats and species, while a range of other tools also provide marine protection. We report on the area covered by these tools as an indirect measure to understand the state of the marine environment.
Marine reserves lie within our territorial sea (12 nautical mile limit) and offer the highest level of marine protection in New Zealand waters. No marine habitat or life form, such as seaweed or fish, may be removed from, or disturbed in, these places.

Layer ID 53497
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 44
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated long-term soil erosion - Sediment load in rivers, by region, 2012

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5496
40
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Soil erosion reduces the productive capacity of land. Sediment entering waterways affects water quality, storage capacity, and biodiversity. Soil erosion in the North Island is primarily due to the historical clearance of forest on steep slopes for pastoral agriculture. South Island soil erosion is primarily due to high rainfall and steep mountainous terrain.

Column headings:
vol_t_yr = volume of sediment entering wayerways each year measured in tonnes

This dataset relates to the "Estimated long-term soil erosion" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52482
Data type Table
Row count 17
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Total suspended particulates exceedances in Auckland, 1965–2013

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5391
6
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Total suspended particulates (TSP) consist of all solid particles and liquid droplets up to 100 micrometres (μm) in diameter (ie when compared with PM10 and PM2.5, TSP is the equivalent of PM100).

TSP can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry) and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of TSP include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. TSP also forms from reactions between gases or between gases and other particles.

The smaller components of TSP (PM10 and PM2.5) are associated with health effects ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer. Reporting on changes in TSP concentrations helps us understand long-term changes in particulate matter pollution.

Column heading:
- No_exceed = number of exceedances

This dataset relates to the "Total suspended particulate concentration in Auckland" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52430
Data type Table
Row count 49
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Livestock numbers, 2002–14

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6089
41
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Livestock numbers reflect changes in the number of farmed beef and dairy cattle, deer, and sheep across New Zealand. Livestock farming is a widespread land use in this country. It is important to monitor this use because it can affect the indigenous biodiversity, soil health, and water quality.

Column headings:
numbers = numbers of animals

This dataset relates to the "Livestock numbers" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52470
Data type Table
Row count 1110
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Soil health and land use - Change in soil sites within target range for given soil health indicators, 1995–2008 and 2009–13

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5688
15
Updated
20 Apr 2017

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 20 Apr 2017.

Updated 21/04/2017
(See "Land domain updates" page for details; www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/environment/env...)

Different land uses put pressure on the land environment and can result in changes to soil health. Healthy soil supports the productivity of agriculture and forestry, and filters water to help prevent waterways becoming contaminated. Soils are considered healthy if they fall within the target ranges for the indicators of acidity, fertility, organic reserves, and physical status.

This dataset relates to the "Soil health and land use" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

For raw data see "2015 land aotearoa soil health data for release.xlsx" attachment below.

Table ID 52484
Data type Table
Row count 8
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
Results 91 to 100 of 996