River flows

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

15266
1147
Added
17 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Feb 2016.

"River flow refers to the quantity of water passing a point in the river over a certain amount of time. Different rivers have different flow patterns, such as sharp peak flows following rain with low flows in between, or high spring flows from snow melt. These flow characteristics affect how much water is available for irrigation, drinking water, hydro–electric power generation, and recreational activities such as fishing and boating. River flows are also very important for maintaining the health and form of a waterway.

This dataset relates to the "Geographic pattern of natural river flows" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

For more information, refer to the March 2015 report: 'Hydrological indices for national environmental reporting' www.mfe.govt.nz/sites/default/files/media/Fresh%20....

Layer ID 53309
Data type Vector multilinestring
Feature count 576277
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine litter 2018-2019

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2969
53
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

These data provide a snap shot of beach litter surveys submitted by Citizen Scientist ‘Monitoring Groups’ up to April, 2019. As defined by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP, 2009), marine litter is any persistent, manufactured or processed solid material discarded, disposed of, abandoned or lost in the marine and coastal environment. Marine litter washed onto beaches is one of the most obvious signs of marine pollution, and can have either land or sea-based origins. Land-based sources of marine litter include input from rivers, sewage and storm water outflows, tourism and recreation, illegal dumping, and waste disposal sites. Sea-based sources include commercial shipping, fisheries and aquaculture activities, recreational boating and offshore installations.

UNEP, 2009. Marine Litter: A Global Challenge. Nairobi: UNEP. 232 pp.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104071
Data type Table
Row count 984
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Fundamental Soil Layers New Zealand Soil Classification

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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16161
407
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"This data describes the location of the different types of soil in New Zealand using the New Zealand Soil Classification.

This data set relates to the "Soils" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website."

Layer ID 52766
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 107298
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual rainfall, 1972–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

13440
448
Added
18 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Feb 2016.

Annual rainfall is the total accumulated rain over one year. Rain is vital for life, including plant growth, drinking water, river ecosystem health, and sanitation. Floods and droughts affect our environment, economy, and recreational opportunities.

This dataset shows annual average rainfall across New Zealand for years 1972 to 2013. Annual rainfall is estimated from the daily rainfall estimates of the Virtual Climate Station Network (NIWA).

This dataset relates to the "Annual average rainfall" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: raster catalogue
Unit: mm/yr

Layer ID 53314
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

River water quality trends, 2008–2017, 1998–2017, and 1990–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6154
69
Updated
15 Apr 2020

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 15 Apr 2020.

16 April 2020: Subsequent to publication in April 2019 we discovered two small errors with this dataset. These included:

  • Errors in the coordinates of some sites and their associated metadata (such as landcover and elevation).
  • Errors in our calculation of dominant landcover.

In addition, flow data from TopNet has also been updated.

These changes have a minor impact on overall results. These changes have have been corrected, and are republished here, as part of the Our freshwater 2020 release.

This dataset measures how water quality in New Zealand’s rivers is changing over time. It contains nine parameters of water quality based on measurements made at monitored river sites in years 1990-2017:

  • Nitrate-nitrogen
  • Ammoniacal nitrogen
  • Total nitrogen
  • Total phosphorus
  • Dissolved reactive phosphorus
  • Water clarity
  • Turbidity
  • Escherichia coli
  • Macroinvertebrate community index

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Summary report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/fresh-water/water-qua....

Table ID 99883
Data type Table
Row count 9225
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Land cover database v4 0 class orders

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

11601
343
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Land cover describes the extent of vegetation, water bodies, built environments, and bare natural surfaces (eg gravel and rock) across New Zealand. Measuring the composition and changes in land cover can help us understand the pressures that different land uses are placing on the biodiversity and functioning of ecosystems.

This data set relates to the "Land cover" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website."

Layer ID 52764
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 479353
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Total rainfall, 2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

7394
197
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

This layer is the total rainfall for the year 2016, summed from interpolated daily rainfall, in mm, not the average.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89420
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Location and extent of NZ's aquifers, 2015

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

13904
245
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"A unit of rock or sediment is called an aquifer when it can yield a usable quantity of water.
Aquifers may occur at different depths in the same location. The map shows the areas of New Zealand’s land surface above one or more aquifers. The aquifer boundaries were described by White (2001), and some boundaries were updated by Moreau and Bekele (2015), using information provided by regional councils and from Lovett and Cameron (2015). The map has 153 polygons (aquifer outlines), some of which have more than one aquifer.
Methods for defining aquifer boundaries generally rely on knowing the locations and characteristics of productive wells, and using geological maps to identify water–bearing materials. In many cases, these boundaries are also influenced by management attributes such as regional or property boundaries, and surface water catchments (Lovett & Cameron, 2015).
This dataset relates to the ""Location and area of New Zealand’s aquifers"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.
"

Layer ID 52675
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 153
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

River water quality, raw data by site, 1975-2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

18693
484
Added
30 Mar 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 30 Mar 2017.

River water quality water is valued for many reasons including ecological function and habitat, recreational value, its role in supporting people and industry, and its cultural significance. Nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus are essential for plant growth, however too much in rivers can lead to ‘nuisance’ growths of river algae and aquatic plants, degrading habitat. High concentrations in the form of ammoniacal nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other aquatic animals. Water clarity is a measure of underwater visibility, and affects habitat of aquatic life such as fish and birds, and can also impact on aesthetic values and recreational use of rivers and streams. Escherichia coli (E.coli) can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces, which can cause illness.

File contains raw data collected at regional council and NIWA monitored sites over the period 1975-2013. Fields are described as follows. Refer to Larned et al. 2015 for further details:
* nemarid ---- Unique NIWA ID
* lawaid ---- Unique LAWA ID
* rcid ---- Collection agency
* srcid ---- Region site is located in
* sflag ---- River (r) or Estuary (e)
* river ---- River name
* location ---- Name of site, assigned by collection agency
* nzmge ---- easting
* nzmgn ---- northing
* nzreach ---- REC1 segment identifier
* sdate ---- Sample date (yyyy-mm-dd)
* Q ---- Flow recorded when sample was taken (if available), cumecs
* npid ---- NIWA parameter ID (as used in Larned et al. 2015)
* lpid ---- LAWA parameter ID
* fdval ---- Parameter value (units are mg/m3, except CLAR (m) and ECOLI (n/100 mL))

For more information please see:
Larned, S, Snelder, T, Unwin, M, McBride, G, Verburg, P, McMillan, H (2015).Analysis of Water Quality in New Zealand lakes and Rivers: data sources, data sets, assumptions, limitations, methods and results. NIWA Client Report no. CHC2015-033. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Mo8VUY from the Ministry for the Environment dataservice.

This dataset relates to the "River water quality" measures on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 53590
Data type Table
Row count 732014
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Erosion risk North Island 2012

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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9487
137
Added
12 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Feb 2016.

"This data records estimated erosion risk for different areas in the North Island.

New Zealand experiences high rates of soil erosion. In the North Island, this is mostly due to the historical clearance of forest for agriculture (see also Estimated long-term soil erosion). In contrast, erosion in the South Island is mostly due to natural processes, primarily high rainfall and steep mountain slopes.
Highly erodible land comprises land at risk of landsliding, gullying, or earthflow erosion if it does not have protective woody vegetation (Dymond et al, 2006). Landsliding occurs on steep slopes where the soils do not have the support of tree roots.
Gullying and earthflow erosion can occur on all slopes, irrespective of steepness, but the land is only considered at risk if it does not have woody vegetation.
Landslide erosion is the shallow (approximately 1m) and sudden failure of soil slopes during storm rainfall. Gully erosion is massive soil erosion that begins at gully heads and expands up hillsides, over decadal time scales. Earthflow erosion is the slow downward movement (approximately 1m/year) of wet soil slopes towards waterways.

This data set relates to the "Estimated highly erodible land in the North Island" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website."

Layer ID 53177
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution 100.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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