The annual SOI compared with New Zealand's detrended temperature series (1909–2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5552
22
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It is an important predictor of how tropical oceans and climate might influence New Zealand’s climate. Being able to predict the timing and intensity of an El Niño or La Niña climate phase is important in predicting and preparing for extreme climatic conditions, such as strong winds, heavy rain, or drought. Such extreme conditions can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities. ENSO is commonly measured using the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI).
In New Zealand, an El Niño phase can cause colder winters. In summer it can result in more rain in the west and drought in the east. A La Niña phase can cause warmer temperatures, more rain in the north-east, and less rain in the south and south-west.
This dataset relates to the "El Niño Southern Oscillation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52590
Data type Table
Row count 105
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual sea surface temperature difference from normal, 2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6087
17
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The oceans store most of the excess energy accumulated due to increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere warming the surface layer. These long-term increases in temperature caused by climate change are in addition to natural variability where ocean temperatures change in response to climate oscillations like the El Niño Southern Oscillation.
Changes in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, environments, and species. Some species may shift range or find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions. Warmer water also takes up more space, which contributes to sea-level rise.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89396
Data type Grid
Resolution About 4548.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Freshwater pests: Water buttercup

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

9925
16
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Freshwater plant and animal pests can have significant negative impacts on ecosystem health by reducing indigenous biodiversity through predation and competition, and destabilising aquatic habitats. Freshwater plant pests can cause economic losses through blocking water intakes for hydroelectricity generation, impeded drainage or irrigation. In addition, pests can affect the suitability for recreational activities.
This dataset relates to the "Freshwater pests" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52742
Data type Vector point
Feature count 283
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation, 1871–2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

7957
75
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) is a long-term oscillation of sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean that can last from 20 to 30 years. Its positive and negative phases affect the strength and frequency of El Niño and La Niña. In New Zealand, the positive phase is linked to stronger west to southwest winds and more rain in the west. This trend is reversed during the negative phase.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89382
Data type Table
Row count 730
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Long term soil erosion North Island 2012

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5141
46
Added
09 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 09 Feb 2016.

"Long-term soil erosion is the average mass of soil lost per square kilometre per year (tonnes/km2/year) over a period of approximately 10 years. It is extrapolated from long-term measurements of sediment load in rivers. Extrapolation is based on mean annual rainfall, rock type, and land cover. The total sediment in rivers (tonnes/year) for a particular region is the sum of all soil erosion over the entire region (Dymond et al, 2010). Soil-erosion rates were calculated to 2012.

This data set relates to the "Estimated long-term soil erosion" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website."

Layer ID 52832
Data type Grid
Resolution 100.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual rainfall, 2009

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4482
25
Added
11 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Feb 2016.

"Annual rainfall is the total accumulated rain over one year. Rain is vital for life, including plant growth, drinking water, river ecosystem health, and sanitation. Floods and droughts affect our environment, economy, and recreational opportunities.

This dataset shows annual average rainfall across New Zealand for 2009 as part of the data series for years 1972 to 2013. Annual rainfall is estimated from the daily rainfall estimates of the Virtual Climate Station Network (NIWA).

This dataset relates to the "Annual average rainfall" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: grid
Unit: mm/yr"

Layer ID 53010
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Predicted average Macroinvertebrate Community Index (MCI) score, 2007–2011

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

9061
58
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Macroinvertebrates are small animals without backbones that live on and under submerged logs, rocks, and aquatic plants in the stream bed during some period of their life cycle. They play a central role in stream ecosystems by feeding on periphyton (algae or slime), macrophytes (aquatic plants), dead leaves and wood, or on each other. High Macroinvertebrate Community Index (MCI) scores generally indicate better stream health. Macroinvertebrates are good continuous indicators of the health of their stream environment. This is because they are relatively sedentary and long–lived (a year or more) which means they live with any stresses or changes that occur in their location (eg, pollution, habitat removal, floods and droughts). They complement discrete measures like chemical monitoring, which only reflects the condition at the exact time and place of sampling. Such monitoring might miss effects of a short–lived pollutant or an unanticipated type of disturbance.
This dataset relates to the ""River water quality: benthic macroinvertebrates"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52713
Data type Vector point
Feature count 512
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Seasonal rainfall, summer , 1981–2010

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5683
37
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89414
Data type Grid
Resolution 500.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrate, ammonia and dissolved reactive phosphorus concentrations, NGMP sites, 2004–13

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

9167
54
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"At high concentrations, nitrate–nitrogen may have health impacts where it is for untreated drinking water, and it is also plant nutrient which can contribute to excessive plant and algae growth, potentially damaging the ecological health of rivers and lakes.
Ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to fish, animals and people at moderate concentrations.
Nitrate can be an indicator of general groundwater degradation as often it is accompanied by other pollutants from human activities, such as faecal pathogens and pesticides.

Dissolved reactive phosphorus is a plant nutrient which can contribute to excessive plant and algae growth, damaging the ecological health of rivers and lakes if it enters surface water.
Surplus phosphorus can originate on land from fertilizer or animal manure, where it can be drained or leached into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. It can also occur naturally in aquifers as a result of water–rock interaction.

This dataset relates to the "Groundwater quality: phosphorus" and "Groundwater quality: nitrogen" measures on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52707
Data type Vector point
Feature count 101
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Freshwater pests: Goldfish

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

8148
30
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Freshwater plant and animal pests can have significant negative impacts on ecosystem health by reducing indigenous biodiversity through predation and competition, and destabilising aquatic habitats. Freshwater plant pests can cause economic losses through blocking water intakes for hydroelectricity generation, impeded drainage or irrigation. In addition, pests can affect the suitability for recreational activities.
This dataset relates to the ""Freshwater pests"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52705
Data type Vector point
Feature count 698
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
Results 171 to 180 of 2349