Ammoniacal nitrogen, 2009–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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8975
47
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Small amounts of nitrogen are a natural component of healthy rivers. Nitrogen in rivers can vary due to differences in land use, climate, elevation, and geology. Nitrogen is transferred from land to water and is cycled through different forms, which can have different effects. Moderate concentrations of nitrate can cause weeds and algae to grow too fast. High concentrations of ammoniacal and nitrate nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other aquatic animals.
This dataset relates to the ""Geographic pattern of nitrogen in river water"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52721
Data type Vector point
Feature count 773
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality, state, 2014-18

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1540
20
Updated
11 Jun 2021

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 11 Jun 2021.

11 June 2021: A revised version of this dataset has been published to correct the terminology used to compare nitrate-nitrogen values to the 3 g/m3 guideline value. The field name has been changed from “reference_condition” to “n_n_guideline”, and values in this field will now be either “Does not exceed” or “Exceeds”, instead of “Meets” or “Does not meet”.

20 July 2020: We corrected the data about drinking water standards for E. coli and nitrate-nitrogen in the key findings for groundwater quality.

For the five-year period 2014‒2018:

  • 68 percent of 364 sites failed to meet the E.coli drinking water standards (changed from 98 percent of 145 sites failed to meet the E. coli drinking water standards)
  • 19 percent of 433 sites didn’t meet nitrate-nitrogen standards (changed from 28 percent of 403 sites failed to meet the nitrate-nitrogen drinking water standards).

This indicator measures groundwater quality in New Zealand’s aquifers and how it is changing over time, based on measurements made at monitored sites. We report on nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, chloride, conductivity and Escherichia coli (E. coli) including:

  • median values for the period 2014–18
  • nitrate-nitrogen median values compared to a guideline value of 3 grams per cubic metre (g/m3). This value is defined as a concentration that indicates groundwater has been influenced by industrialised agriculture and is highly likely to have been impacted by human activity (per Morgenstern & Daughney, 2012 and Daughney & Reeves, 2005).
  • the proportion of samples from each site that have concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen or E. coli in excess of the Maximum Acceptable Values for protection of human health (Ministry of Health, 2018).

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104569
Data type Table
Row count 14644
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bird species on public conservation land, estimated abundance 2013–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6501
32
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The status of our bird communities is an important indicator of the condition of our ecosystems. Many indigenous birds play key ecological roles, including dispersing seeds and pollinating flowers. In some situations, exotic bird species (not indigenous to New Zealand) can partially fulfil these roles. A reduction in the distribution and/or decline in numbers for common and widespread species can equate to large losses of individuals and ecosystem integrity. By measuring the composition of bird communities across public conservation land (forest and non-forest sites) we can monitor how they change over time.

This measure reports on the estimated abundance of seven common bird species on public conservation land, 2013–2016.Common species are species having occupancy over half of public conservation land.

Table ID 95337
Data type Table
Row count 56
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual sunshine hours, 2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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7015
57
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Sunshine is essential for our mental and physical well-being and plant growth. It is also important for tourism and recreation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89449
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Water clarity trends, 2009–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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9587
52
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

Water clarity is a measure of underwater visibility in rivers and stream. Water clarity can be reduced by the presence of fine particles like silt, mud or organic material in the water. This affects the habitat and feeding of aquatic life like fish and aquatic birds. Water clarity is an important indicator of the health of a waterway, and is also a consideration for recreational activities like swimming and wading.
This dataset relates to the "River water quality trends: clarity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Layer ID 52685
Data type Vector point
Feature count 722
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Global and New Zealand temperature anomalies, 1909–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5674
14
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

This dataset compares temperatures anomalies from NIWA's 'seven-station' temperature series with three global temperature series.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89452
Data type Table
Row count 855
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Time series for two coastal sea surface temperature monitoring stations (1953–2012)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6416
55
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Coastal sea-surface temperature is influenced by solar heating and cooling, latitude, and local geography. It is hard for some marine species to survive when the sea temperature changes. This can affect marine ecosystems and processes. It can also affect fish-farming industries based in our coastal areas.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52525
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

River water quality trends by monitoring site, 1989-2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7636
128
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

River water quality water is valued for many reasons including ecological function and habitat, recreational value, its role in supporting people and industry, and its cultural significance. Nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus are essential for plant growth, however too much in rivers can lead to ‘nuisance’ growths of river algae and aquatic plants, degrading habitat. High concentrations in the form of ammoniacal nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other aquatic animals. Water clarity is a measure of underwater visibility, and affects habitat of aquatic life such as fish and birds, and can also impact on aesthetic values and recreational use of rivers and streams.

Trend statistics and calculation results for the periods 1989-2013, 1994-2013, and 2004-2013 are provided by monitored site. Units for parameters are mg/m3, except CLAR (m). Refer to Larned at al. 2015 for further details.

For more information please see:
Larned, S, Snelder, T, Unwin, M, McBride, G, Verburg, P, McMillan, H (2015).Analysis of Water Quality in New Zealand lakes and Rivers: data sources, data sets, assumptions, limitations, methods and results. NIWA Client Report no. CHC2015-033. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/DDui3u from the Ministry for the Environment dataservice.

This dataset relates to the "River water quality" measures on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52531
Data type Table
Row count 4148
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lake water quality, 2009–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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11332
80
Added
17 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Feb 2016.

"The Lake Trophic Level Index (TLI) characterises the life supporting capacity of a lake based on nutrient enrichment. In general, the higher the TLI score, the poorer the water quality in the lake. Lakes with extremely poor quality are rarely suitable for recreation and provide poor quality habitat for aquatic species.
Care should be taken when interpreting these results. Monitored lakes consist of about 4 percent of all New Zealand lakes, and programmes may focus on those that have poor water quality or are at risk due to the type of land use in their catchment.
After checking for data consistency, the lakes considered suitable for national comparison are sparsely and unevenly distributed, with gaps in the Manawatu, Taranaki, Tasman, Marlborough, Otago, and West Coast regions. The lakes considered in the analysis are located mainly in Northland, Bay of Plenty, Hawke’s Bay, and Canterbury.
This dataset relates to the ""Lake water quality: trophic level index"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.
"

Layer ID 53310
Data type Vector point
Feature count 86
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Growing degree days trend assessment, by site, 1972/3–2015/6

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6134
27
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

Growing degree days (GDD) measures the amount of warmth available for plant and insect growth and can be used to predict when flowers will bloom and crops and insects will mature. GDD counts the total number of degrees Celsius each day is above a threshold temperature. In this report we used 10 degrees Celsius. Increased GDD means that plants and insects reach maturity faster, provided that other conditions necessary for growth are favourable, such as sufficient moisture and nutrients. As a measure of temperature, GDD experiences short-term changes in response to climate variations, such as El Niño, and in the longer-term is affected by our warming climate.
Growing degree days (GDD) counts the number of days that are warmer than a threshold temperature (Tbase) in a year. GDD is calculated by subtracting the Tbase from the average daily temperature (maximum plus minimum temperature divided by two). If the average daily temperature is less than Tbase the GDD for that day is assigned a value of zero.
This dataset gives the trend in GDD over growing seasons (July 1 – June 30 of the following year) for 30 sites.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89481
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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