Average number of days wind speed exceeded gale force (Beaufort Scale 8)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2660
9
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

The ocean storm index estimates the number of days in a year when wind speeds exceed gale and storm force on the Beaufort Scale. In a gale, sea conditions are rough and waves can be over six metres high. In a storm, waves can be over 10 metres high. To put this into context, on land a near gale would make walking difficult, and a storm would cause some damage to roofs, chimneys, and trees. Climate change could lead to changes in the frequency and intensity of storms. More frequent and intense storms will likely be a stressor for habitats and species.
The ocean storm index estimates the number of days that wind speeds exceed gale and storm force on the Beaufort Scale. The Beaufort Scale is a widely used international classification that rates sea conditions from 0 (calm) to 12 (hurricane). We report on estimated wind speeds broken down to:
- gales – measure 8 on the scale, have rough sea conditions with wind speeds of approximately 62–74 km per hour and wave heights of 5.5 metres
- storms – measure 10 on the scale, have wind speeds of approximately 89–102 km per hour and wave heights of 9–11.5 metres (McDonald & Parsons, 2016).
This data relates to the average number of days wind speed exceeded gale force (Beaufort Scale 8) from 1979–2015.

Layer ID 53461
Data type Grid
Resolution About 47632.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths (1921–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2633
35
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

The Hector’s and Māui dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. These coastal dolphins are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). Māui dolphins are found on the west coast of the North Island, most often between Maunganui Bluff, north of Dargaville, and New Plymouth. Hector’s dolphins are mostly found around the South Island. Both subspecies are threatened with extinction. The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui dolphin is nationally critical. Dolphins can become entangled in fishing gear used by both commercial and recreational fishers, with set nets posing a particularly high risk. Reporting the bycatch of protected species helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
We report on two aspects of Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths based on data extracted from the Department of Conservation (DOC) Incident Database for 1921–2015: the number of dolphin deaths by cause of death, including a comparison of deaths over 1996–2015; and the number of dolphin deaths from entanglement by type of fishing gear.

Table ID 53475
Data type Table
Row count 561
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bird species on public conservation land, estimated diversity 2013–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2650
16
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The status of our bird communities is an important indicator of the condition of our ecosystems. Many indigenous birds play key ecological roles, including dispersing seeds and pollinating flowers. In some situations, exotic bird species (not indigenous to New Zealand) can partially fulfil these roles. A reduction in the distribution and/or decline in numbers for common and widespread species can equate to large losses of individuals and ecosystem integrity. By measuring the composition of bird communities across public conservation land (forest and non–forest sites) we can monitor how they change over time.

This measure reports on the predicted richness (diversity) of bird species on public conservation land, by monitoring site, 2013–2016.

Table ID 95338
Data type Table
Row count 1056
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Urban water quality - all data - 1985–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2619
38
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Urban water quality indicators include heavy metals, nutrients, and E.coli. The concentrations of these indicators are compared to the proportion of urban land cover in catchments.

Heavy metals have the ability to accumulate in sediments, shellfish, and other aquatic organisms. Metals can reach toxic levels in organisms making them unsafe to consume and can be toxic to aquatic life. Nutrients can cause excessive algal growth and E.coli has the ability to make people sick while they are swimming if concentrations are high enough. Rivers with poor water quality are rarely suitable for recreation and provide poor habitats for aquatic species.

File contains data related to each sampling occasion by site for each water quality indicator in Auckland, Wellington, and Christchurch over the period 1985–15.

Table ID 53600
Data type Table
Row count 58661
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bird species on public conservation land, estimated occupancy 2013–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2627
8
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The status of our bird communities is an important indicator of the condition of our ecosystems. Many indigenous birds play key ecological roles, including dispersing seeds and pollinating flowers. In some situations, exotic bird species (not indigenous to New Zealand) can partially fulfill these roles. A reduction in the distribution and/or decline in numbers for common and widespread species can equate to large losses of individuals and ecosystem integrity. By measuring the composition of bird communities across public conservation land (forest and non-forest sites) we can monitor how they change over time.

This measure reports on the occupancy of indigenous and exotic bird species on public conservation land, by wood cover, averaged over surveys from 2013 to 2016.

Table ID 95339
Data type Table
Row count 156
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of trawl tows (1990–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2612
21
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging (where fishing gear is towed near or along the ocean floor) can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. These fishing methods can also stir up sediment from the seabed, creating sediment plumes that can smother sensitive species. Recovery times for affected habitats and species depend on their sensitivity and the area affected by trawling or dredging. Bottom trawling is carried out on or near the seabed in both shallow and deep waters. Dredging is carried out on the seabed in shallow waters and targets marine creatures such as scallops. This measure focuses on deepwater areas (waters deeper than 200m).

Table ID 53487
Data type Table
Row count 75
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater pesticides survey, 2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2618
13
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Pesticides, which include insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and plant growth regulators, are commonly used in New Zealand to control insects, diseases and weeds in primary industries such as agricultural farming, forestry and horticulture. Once applied to land or crops, pesticides can make their way through soil and enter groundwater systems.

File contains whether a pesticide was detected at monitored wells, and if so, what the concentration is. File also includes surrounding land use, well use, well diameter, well depth, and screen depth, where available.

Table ID 53605
Data type Table
Row count 153
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Accumulated freshwater takes, 2013–14

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2565
48
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Flow is the volume of water passing a point over a certain time, and provides information about the availability of water for people and the environment. Overall, this affects how much water is available for irrigation, drinking water, hydroelectricity generation, and recreational activities. River flows also influence a waterway’s physical form, habitat, and ecological processes like migration, spawning, and food supply for aquatic life.

The file provides the estimated impact of upstream consents on the modelled median flow of a particular reach in the digital river network. This is calculated by upstream total consented takes by median flow.

Table ID 53614
Data type Table
Row count 692989
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

He Pātaka Wai Ora Report_datasheet raw water quality

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2602
5
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Table ID 53611
Data type Table
Row count 796
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated sea lion captures in all trawl fisheries (1996–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2595
11
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

Sea lions and fur seals are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters, along with seabirds and dolphins. Trawling poses a risk to both species. Fur seals can also be captured by other fishing gear, including long lines. Estimating the bycatch of sea lions and fur seals indicates the pressures they face from current fishing practices.
The New Zealand sea lion Phocarctos hookeri is threatened with extinction and is classified as nationally critical. Its population is steadily falling at some breeding locations (Baker et al, 2010). Fisheries are one of the pressures on the species.
The Fisheries Act 1996 designates this species as protected and requires mitigation measures to reduce bycatch (Ministry for Primary Industries, 2014).

Table ID 53471
Data type Table
Row count 19
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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