Shark catch use (2003–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2342
31
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

New Zealand waters have at least 117 species of chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, and other cartilaginous fish species). They are particularly vulnerable to overfishing because they are long-lived, mature slowly, and have a low reproductive rate. Chondrichthyans are important for healthy ocean ecosystems, and reporting their commercial catch and bycatch helps us understand the sustainability of our fisheries.

Table ID 53482
Data type Table
Row count 52
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of indigenous land species, 2010–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2320
23
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

New Zealand has unique indigenous plants and animals that are our national taonga (treasures). Because most are endemic (found nowhere else in the world) New Zealand makes an important contribution to global biodiversity. Biodiversity is important for ecosystem processes, te ao Māori including mahinga kai (customary food gathering), and culture and recreation.

The conservation status of our biodiversity represents their risk of extinction. This data covers the conservation status, and most-recent change in status, of native and resident taxa for which we had sufficient information on abundance and distribution. This includes bats, birds, earthworms, lichens, plants, reptiles and frogs, snails, spiders, and insects.

We also include the number of species that have had a genuine change in conservation status between assessment periods.Where conservation status changed, this measure also looked at the NCTCS listings done in 2012 for birds (Robertson et al, 2017); 2012 for reptiles (Hitchmough et al, 2015); and 2010 for Orthoptera (Trewick et al, 2012). A change in a species’ conservation status reflects a change in its risk of extinction.

For more information on the Department of Conservation’s Threat Classification System (NZTCS) please refer to: www.doc.govt.nz/nztcs

Table ID 95341
Data type Table
Row count 8679
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Use of public conservation land, Great walks, 2005–17

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2312
25
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

One third of our land area is held as public conservation land and managed by the Department of Conservation (DOC) to protect natural and cultural heritage, retain areas of wilderness and enable recreation opportunities. Although the use of public conservation land makes an important socio-economic contribution at the local, regional and national level, increasing human activities on our protected areas can put pressure on these environments and degrade their cultural and aesthetic value. These activities can range from recreational users on our Great Walks to commercial activities such as guiding, grazing, or building structures.

This measure reports on the capacity and number of booked bed nights in huts and campsites on nine Great Walks operating in national parks, by walk, hut/campsite and month.

Table ID 95346
Data type Table
Row count 25098
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Change in farm numbers, 2002–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2308
27
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The number of farms involved in agricultural activities, and how they are changing, is important because agricultural activities can affect soil health and water.

Agricultural activities include beef and sheep, dairy, arable, horticulture, deer, pigs, and other livestock.

Table ID 95340
Data type Table
Row count 560
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Use of Māori land, land use, 2006–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2283
14
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Land (whenua) is taonga tuku iho (cultural property, heritage) and of special importance to Māori. As the whakapūmautanga (legacy for the future), whenua provides for cultivation and storage of traditional foods and plants – for customary use and mahinga kai, and helps sustain each generation.

We report only on the available data we have, which cover a subset of Māori land used for primary production activities. The main land use types covered are grassland, forest plantation, bush and scrub, and horticulture.

Table ID 95351
Data type Table
Row count 990
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Selected barriers to freshwater fish in Hawke’s Bay, 2002–10

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2297
9
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Many of New Zealand’s iconic freshwater fish species are diadromous, which means they need to migrate between fresh water and the ocean to complete their life cycles. Some man-made structures such as culverts, weirs, stormwater pump stations, tide gates, and dams can obstruct diadromous fish migrations and prevent fish from reaching critical habitats.

This can result in the gradual decline and loss of fish species from some rivers, and streams and lakes. Protecting the connection between upstream and downstream habitats of our indigenous fish is as important as protecting their habitats themselves.

We do not yet have enough data to provide a national picture on fish barriers, so we report on known barriers to freshwater fish passage in the Hawke’s Bay region from culverts, weirs, and stormwater pump stations.

Table ID 53607
Data type Table
Row count 80
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated sea lion captures in all trawl fisheries (1996–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2286
11
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

Sea lions and fur seals are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters, along with seabirds and dolphins. Trawling poses a risk to both species. Fur seals can also be captured by other fishing gear, including long lines. Estimating the bycatch of sea lions and fur seals indicates the pressures they face from current fishing practices.
The New Zealand sea lion Phocarctos hookeri is threatened with extinction and is classified as nationally critical. Its population is steadily falling at some breeding locations (Baker et al, 2010). Fisheries are one of the pressures on the species.
The Fisheries Act 1996 designates this species as protected and requires mitigation measures to reduce bycatch (Ministry for Primary Industries, 2014).

Table ID 53471
Data type Table
Row count 19
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Use of public conservation land, concessions, 2012–17

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2264
14
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

One third of our land area is held as public conservation land and managed by the Department of Conservation (DOC) to protect natural and cultural heritage, retain areas of wilderness and enable recreation opportunities. Although the use of public conservation land makes an important socio-economic contribution at the local, regional and national level, increasing human activities on our protected areas can put pressure on these environments and degrade their cultural and aesthetic value.

This measure reports on the number of active recreation and non-recreation concessions by activity in each financial year, and the number of active concession operators (concessionaires) by activity in each financial year.

Table ID 95349
Data type Table
Row count 432
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of trawl tows (1990–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2254
21
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging (where fishing gear is towed near or along the ocean floor) can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. These fishing methods can also stir up sediment from the seabed, creating sediment plumes that can smother sensitive species. Recovery times for affected habitats and species depend on their sensitivity and the area affected by trawling or dredging. Bottom trawling is carried out on or near the seabed in both shallow and deep waters. Dredging is carried out on the seabed in shallow waters and targets marine creatures such as scallops. This measure focuses on deepwater areas (waters deeper than 200m).

Table ID 53487
Data type Table
Row count 75
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths (1921–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2245
33
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

The Hector’s and Māui dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. These coastal dolphins are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). Māui dolphins are found on the west coast of the North Island, most often between Maunganui Bluff, north of Dargaville, and New Plymouth. Hector’s dolphins are mostly found around the South Island. Both subspecies are threatened with extinction. The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui dolphin is nationally critical. Dolphins can become entangled in fishing gear used by both commercial and recreational fishers, with set nets posing a particularly high risk. Reporting the bycatch of protected species helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
We report on two aspects of Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths based on data extracted from the Department of Conservation (DOC) Incident Database for 1921–2015: the number of dolphin deaths by cause of death, including a comparison of deaths over 1996–2015; and the number of dolphin deaths from entanglement by type of fishing gear.

Table ID 53475
Data type Table
Row count 561
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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