Marine Reserves (2016 report)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3874
33
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

New Zealand’s four million km2 marine environment is diverse, with a range of coastal habitats and offshore seabed environments. There are also many marine species unique to New Zealand. Marine protected areas conserve or manage some of these unique habitats and species, while a range of other tools also provide marine protection. We report on the area covered by these tools as an indirect measure to understand the state of the marine environment.
Marine reserves lie within our territorial sea (12 nautical mile limit) and offer the highest level of marine protection in New Zealand waters. No marine habitat or life form, such as seaweed or fish, may be removed from, or disturbed in, these places.

Layer ID 53497
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 44
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Freshwater fish observational data, 1977-2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3791
72
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Freshwater fish are an important component of freshwater ecosystems, have intrinsic biodiversity values and are a valued resource for Māori, recreational and commercial fishers. The presence or absence of a fish species can be affected by changes in catchment land cover and land use, in-stream habitat, fish passages (routes for moving up and down waterways), pests, and contaminants.

The file contains the information associated with each record in the New Zealand Freshwater Fish Database used in the report, and the associated River Environment Classification information of the location of the observation.

Table ID 53599
Data type Table
Row count 26915
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of extreme wave events exceeding 8m in coastal regions, 2008–15

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3650
16
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Extreme wave indexes estimate the occurrence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters. Extreme wave indexes estimate the number of times a significant wave height exceeds one of three threshold values for at least 12 hours in 24 marine regions. The three wave-height thresholds are four metres, six metres, and eight metres.
This indicator estimates the exceedances of a wave-height threshold for each year from 2008 to 2015 in coastal regions.
Significant wave height is a measure of the ‘typical’ wave height in a place over a time period. It is four times the standard deviation of the water surface if, for example, you were to measure water moving up and down a jetty piling for an hour. The largest individual wave will typically have a height around twice the significant wave height.
We use three wave-height thresholds because of the regional variation in extreme wave events. In general, the north experiences less exposure to consistently strong winds, and the waves generated by them, than the south. Four-metre tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts of New Zealand but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.
This dataset relates to the number of extreme wave events exceeding the eight metre threshold in coastal regions.

Layer ID 53502
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 144
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of extreme wave events exceeding 6m in oceanic regions, 2008–15

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3639
12
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Extreme wave indexes estimate the occurrence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters. Extreme wave indexes estimate the number of times a significant wave height exceeds one of three threshold values for at least 12 hours in 24 marine regions. The three wave-height thresholds are four metres, six metres, and eight metres.
This indicator estimates the exceedances of a wave-height threshold for each year from 2008 to 2015 in oceanic regions.
Significant wave height is a measure of the ‘typical’ wave height in a place over a time period. It is four times the standard deviation of the water surface if, for example, you were to measure water moving up and down a jetty piling for an hour. The largest individual wave will typically have a height around twice the significant wave height.
We use three wave-height thresholds because of the regional variation in extreme wave events. In general, the north experiences less exposure to consistently strong winds, and the waves generated by them, than the south. Four-metre tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts of New Zealand but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.
This dataset relates to the number of extreme wave events exceeding the six metre threshold in oceanic regions.

Layer ID 53504
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 48
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Type 2 Marine Protected Areas (2016 report)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3604
30
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

New Zealand’s four million km2 marine environment is diverse, with a range of coastal habitats and offshore seabed environments. There are also many marine species unique to New Zealand. Marine protected areas (MPAs) conserve or manage some of these unique habitats and species, while a range of other tools also provide marine protection. We report on the area covered by these tools as an indirect measure to understand the state of the marine environment.
Type 2 MPAs have lower levels of protection than marine reserves. For example, they may allow fishing but restrict seabed trawling.

Layer ID 53499
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 43
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Livestock numbers, 1994–2017

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3399
74
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Livestock farming is a widespread land use in New Zealand and contributes to our economy. High livestock numbers and the distribution of livestock across land environments can affect indigenous biodiversity and soil health (eg compaction). High livestock numbers and density in some land environments can also affect water quality, as nitrogen and bacteria from urine and faeces can leach into groundwater or run off the land into rivers and lakes.

We measure changes in the numbers of farmed livestock (eg beef and dairy cattle, deer, and sheep) across regions in New Zealand.

Table ID 95344
Data type Table
Row count 2075
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of extreme wave events exceeding 8m in oceanic regions, 2008–15

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3363
9
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Extreme wave indexes estimate the occurrence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters. Extreme wave indexes estimate the number of times a significant wave height exceeds one of three threshold values for at least 12 hours in 24 marine regions. The three wave-height thresholds are four metres, six metres, and eight metres.
This indicator estimates the exceedances of a wave-height threshold for each year from 2008 to 2015 in oceanic regions.
Significant wave height is a measure of the ‘typical’ wave height in a place over a time period. It is four times the standard deviation of the water surface if, for example, you were to measure water moving up and down a jetty piling for an hour. The largest individual wave will typically have a height around twice the significant wave height.
We use three wave-height thresholds because of the regional variation in extreme wave events. In general, the north experiences less exposure to consistently strong winds, and the waves generated by them, than the south. Four-metre tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts of New Zealand but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.
This dataset relates to the number of extreme wave events exceeding the eight metre threshold in oceanic regions.

Layer ID 53505
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 48
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Primary use and source of consented freshwater takes, 2013–14

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3192
82
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Regional councils issue resource consents for the taking of fresh water for various purposes, including irrigation, drinking, hydroelectricity, and industry. Water can be taken from surface water or groundwater.

The file provides the primary source and primary use of the water take for each consented take.

Table ID 53613
Data type Table
Row count 16154
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of native freshwater fish and invertebrates, 2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3128
45
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

New Zealand has a diverse range of freshwater species. Many of these species are endemic to (only occur in, or only breed in) New Zealand. Freshwater fish and invertebrates are indicator species for the state of our freshwater environment. A decreasing population can indicate that the ecosystem is degrading.

This measure reports on the conservation status of New Zealand's indigenous freshwater fish and invertebrate species, including the number of species that have had a genuine change in conservation status between two monitoring periods (2009–13 and 2005–13). A change in a species’ conservation status reflects a change in its risk of extinction.

Table ID 53612
Data type Table
Row count 723
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Predicted river water quality, 2009–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3035
120
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

River water quality is valued for many reasons including ecological function and habitat, recreational value, its role in supporting people and industry, and its cultural significance. Nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus are essential for plant growth, however too much in rivers can lead to excessive growth of river algae, which can degrade habitat.

High concentrations of nitrogen in the form of ammoniacal nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other aquatic animals, and nitrate-nitrogen can be toxic to humans. Water clarity is a measure of underwater visibility, and affects habitat of aquatic life such as fish and birds, and can also impact on aesthetic values and recreational use of rivers and streams. Escherichia coli (E.coli) can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces, which can cause illness.

File contains the model outputs for river water quality indicators as medians for each river segment in New Zealand’s digital river network.

Table ID 53601
Data type Table
Row count 593444
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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