Ocean and coastal extreme waves (4m), 2008

750
4
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

These data estimate the occurence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters for 2008, particularly for wave events where significant wave height exceeds a threshold of 4 metres and for a period of at least 12 hours. Significant wave height is defined as four times the square root of the variance of sea surface elevation due to wave motion.

This index was generated using NIWA’s operational wave forecasting model NZWAVE-12.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 104073
Data type Grid
Resolution About 13356.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

MfE Low-slope extent 2019 DEPRECATED

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5876
97
Added
01 Sep 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Sep 2019.

This dataset shows land parcels within grassland and annual cropping areas which have an average slope of less than 10 degrees. Polygons are attributed into 3 slope classes: less than 5 degrees mean slope; 5 - 7 degrees mean slope; 7 - 10 degrees mean slope.

Layer ID 103847
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 589664
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W)

NZ Hill Country Winter Forage 2018

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3775
40
Added
23 Aug 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 23 Aug 2019.

The dataset maps areas of winter forage cropping and intensive winter grazing occurring in hill country areas during 2018. Hill country is defined as areas where paddocks have an average slope of greater than 7 degrees. Paddocks are classified into crop type and a measure is provided of the proportion of bare ground within the paddock after grazing.

Layer ID 103810
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 9044
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Sea-draining catchments

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3071
390
Updated
24 Jul 2019

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 24 Jul 2019.

This dataset provides boundaries for catchments that drain to the sea (i.e. sea draining catchments).

It is extracted from the Freshwater Ecosystems of New Zealand (FENZ) v1.0 geodatabase. Ministry for the Environment hosts this copy of this layer for convenience and visibility. For all inquiries please contact Department of Conservation directly.

FENZ requires specialist GIS knowledge for its technical operation and biodiversity knowledge for understanding the content. Because of FENZ’s complexity, DOC is providing advice, briefings and training (where possible) to ensure users understand its strengths, limitations and appropriate applications.

If you would like more information about FENZ or access to any FENZ data sets, email fenz@doc.govt.nz.

www.doc.govt.nz/our-work/freshwater-ecosystems-of-...

Variables:

Catch_id - This is a unique identifier that can be used to link to other datasets in the FENZ database, or datasets from other sources that also use a FENZ id.

Catchment names:

Currently a definitive catchment names dataset does not exist. However for your convenience, an unofficial list has been provided in the attachments ("fenz_catnames.csv") which can be joined to the catchment boundaries to provide names. Feedback on the accuracy or completeness of these names is welcomed.

Layer ID 99776
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 10131
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W)

NZ Airsheds Gazetted

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

10770
71
Updated
06 Oct 2020

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 06 Oct 2020.

A spatial dataset delineating the extent of regional airsheds notified in the New Zealand Gazette (gazette.govt.nz).

Layer ID 98617
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 73
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual PED, 2015/16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5287
11
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. As our climate changes, increasing temperatures and rainfall pattern changes are expected to increase PED, and the frequency and intensity of drought, particularly in currently drought-prone regions.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89486
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual PED, 2014/15

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5085
13
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. As our climate changes, increasing temperatures and rainfall pattern changes are expected to increase PED, and the frequency and intensity of drought, particularly in currently drought-prone regions.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89485
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual PED, 2013/14

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4827
5
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. As our climate changes, increasing temperatures and rainfall pattern changes are expected to increase PED, and the frequency and intensity of drought, particularly in currently drought-prone regions.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89484
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Anomaly PED, 2013/14–2015/16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4881
5
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. As our climate changes, increasing temperatures and rainfall pattern changes are expected to increase PED, and the frequency and intensity of drought, particularly in currently drought-prone regions.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89483
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual sunshine hours, 2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6531
53
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Sunshine is essential for our mental and physical well-being and plant growth. It is also important for tourism and recreation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89449
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
Results 21 to 30 of 494