Annual ground and sea lightning strikes (2001–14)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6876
20
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Lightning is the discharge of electricity from thunderstorms. Ground strikes can cause significant damage to property and infrastructure, and injure or kill people and livestock. Lightning is often associated with other severe weather events, such as strong wind gusts. Thunderstorms may increase in frequency and intensity with climate change.
This dataset relates to the "Lightning" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52587
Data type Table
Row count 15
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

El Niño Southern Oscillation Index (1909–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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8390
97
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It is an important predictor of how tropical oceans and climate might influence New Zealand’s climate. Being able to predict the timing and intensity of an El Niño or La Niña climate phase is important in predicting and preparing for extreme climatic conditions, such as strong winds, heavy rain, or drought. Such extreme conditions can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities. ENSO is commonly measured using the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI).
In New Zealand, an El Niño phase can cause colder winters. In summer it can result in more rain in the west and drought in the east. A La Niña phase can cause warmer temperatures, more rain in the north-east, and less rain in the south and south-west.
This dataset relates to the "El Niño Southern Oscillation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52589
Data type Table
Row count 1729
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

The annual SOI compared with New Zealand's detrended temperature series (1909–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6762
23
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It is an important predictor of how tropical oceans and climate might influence New Zealand’s climate. Being able to predict the timing and intensity of an El Niño or La Niña climate phase is important in predicting and preparing for extreme climatic conditions, such as strong winds, heavy rain, or drought. Such extreme conditions can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities. ENSO is commonly measured using the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI).
In New Zealand, an El Niño phase can cause colder winters. In summer it can result in more rain in the west and drought in the east. A La Niña phase can cause warmer temperatures, more rain in the north-east, and less rain in the south and south-west.
This dataset relates to the "El Niño Southern Oscillation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52590
Data type Table
Row count 105
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual average Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation Index (1871–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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10233
97
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) describes the long-term oscillation of the Pacific Ocean. The Pacific climate oscillation causes climate fluctuations that can influence New Zealand’s climate. For example, it can affect the strength and frequency of El Niño and La Niña events. In New Zealand, the positive phase of the IPO is linked to stronger west to southwest winds and more rain to the west. Such climate phases can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities.
The IPO is similar, and nearly equivalent, to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The PDO is a predictor of the impact of the climate oscillation in the northern Pacific.
This dataset relates to the "Inter-decadal Pacific oscillation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52591
Data type Table
Row count 143
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern annular mode (1887–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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8304
33
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is an index that describes climate variation around the South Pole and Antarctica, as far north as New Zealand. It indicates short-term climate variations that can influence New Zealand’s climate. Such climate variations can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities.
The variation is caused by the movement of a low-pressure belt that generates westerly winds. During a negative phase, the low pressure belt moves north, towards the equator. In New Zealand, this can cause increased westerly winds, unsettled weather, and storm activity over most of the country. Over the southern oceans, there are relatively less westerly winds and less storm activity.
During a positive phase, the low pressure belt moves south towards Antarctica. In New Zealand, this can cause relatively light winds and more settled weather. Over the southern oceans, there is increased westerly winds and storm activity.
This dataset relates to the "Southern annular mode" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52592
Data type Table
Row count 128
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated contemporary and pre-human wetland area, by region (2008 estimate)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7434
72
Added
07 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 07 Oct 2015.

Wetlands support unique biodiversity and provide important services. They clean water of excess nutrients and sediment, help absorb floodwaters, and act as carbon sinks (remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere). They also have cultural importance for Māori, and provide valuable food and materials (eg flax). Draining wetlands for agricultural and urban development over the past 150 years has significantly reduced their extent, leading to a loss of biodiversity and natural function. This dataset contains estimates of the extent of wetlands in pre-human and contemporary times by regional council area, and nationally.

This dataset relates to the "Wetland extent" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52593
Data type Table
Row count 34
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Water physical stocks for selected measures (1995–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7222
28
Added
15 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2015.

New Zealand is a water-rich country. Water is found in a network of waterways and lakes, as ground water, in glaciers, and in the soil and plants. Changes in temperature and precipitation patterns affect our water stocks, for example leading to low flows or floods. Water physical stocks show how climate changes can impact on our environment, its ecosystems, and ultimately our lifestyles.
Further information can be found in:
Collins, D, Zammit, C, Willsman, A & Henderson, R (2015) Surface water components of New Zealand’s National WaterAccounts, 1995-2014. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment May 2015. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Tebsax on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Water physical stocks: precipitation and evapotranspiration" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.
Variables: Abstraction for Hydrogeneration, Change in Ice, Change in Lakes, Change in Snow, Change in Soil Moisture, Discharge by Hydrogeneration, Evapotranspiration, Inflow from other regions, Outflow to other regions, Outflow to sea, Precipitation, Total.

Table ID 52596
Data type Table
Row count 240
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 is of particular concern because of high concentrations in some areas. It can also damage health, with associated effects ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer. This indicator considers PM10 from human-made sources, such as burning wood or coal for home heating or road motor vehicle emissions.

We report on the estimated number of premature deaths, hospitalisations, and restricted activity days for the New Zealand population (per 100,000 people) from exposure to PM10 from human activities.

• Premature deaths are deaths, often preventable, that occur before a person reaches the age they were expected to live to.
• Hospitalisations relate to hospitalisations for respiratory and cardiac illnesses (not including cases leading to premature death).
• Restricted activity days occur when symptoms are sufficient to limit usual activities such as work or study.

This dataset relates to the "Health effects from exposure to PM10" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

The Health effects from PM10: 2012 updated HAPINZ model can be found at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/KJdi75 and the updated exposure model can be found at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/wgSS3a on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).

Table ID 52597
Data type Table
Row count 6
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Health effects from PM10 2006 and 2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6915
11
Added
15 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 is of particular concern because of high concentrations in some areas. It can also damage health, with associated effects ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer. This indicator considers PM10 from human-made sources, such as burning wood or coal for home heating or road motor vehicle emissions.

We report on the estimated number of premature deaths, hospitalisations, and restricted activity days for the New Zealand population from exposure to PM10 from human activities.

• Premature deaths are deaths, often preventable, that occur before a person reaches the age they were expected to live to.
• Hospitalisations relate to hospitalisations for respiratory and cardiac illnesses (not including cases leading to premature death).
• Restricted activity days occur when symptoms are sufficient to limit usual activities such as work or study.

This dataset relates to the "Health effects from exposure to PM10" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52598
Data type Table
Row count 18
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM10 exceedances by airshed 2006–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6635
21
Added
02 Dec 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 02 Dec 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of PM10 include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main human-made source of PM10.

PM10 is of particular concern because it is found in high concentrations in some areas and can damage health. It is associated with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer.

Column heading:
- No_exceed = number of exceedances

This dataset relates to the "PM10 daily concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52624
Data type Table
Row count 360
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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