Soil quality and land use, 1995–2017

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3538
55
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Soil supports the productivity of agriculture, horticulture, and forestry, and filters water to help prevent waterways from becoming contaminated. Different land uses put pressure on the land environment and can change soil quality. Soil quality is assessed under four different groups of land uses: forestry, cropping and horticulture, dairy, and dry stock by measuring the following soil properties: acidity (pH), fertility (Olsen P), organic reserves (total carbon, total nitrogen, mineralisable nitrogen), and physical status (macroporosity and bulk density). Soil scientists have identified the target range for each of these indicators, for maintaining production but with a prime focus for managing risk to the environment.

This measure reports on soil quality, by land use and soil order.

Table ID 95345
Data type Table
Row count 1179
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Land cover, 1996–2012

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3809
30
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Land cover describes the extent of vegetation, water bodies, built environments, and bare natural surfaces (eg gravel and rock) across New Zealand. Measuring the composition of and changes in land cover can help us understand the pressures that different land uses are placing on the biodiversity and functioning of ecosystems.

This measure reports on land cover by class, regional council area, and year.

For more information on the Landcover Database please refer to: lris.scinfo.org.nz/layer/48423-lcdb-v41-land-cover...

Table ID 95348
Data type Table
Row count 3316
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Wetland extent, 2001-16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

7232
149
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Wetlands support high levels of biodiversity. They provide habitat for native invertebrates, plants, fish, and bird species (eg fernbird, kōkopu, and eels), many of which live only in wetlands. Wetlands act as ‘kidneys’ and giant sponges – they clean the water of excess nutrients and sediment, control flood water and pollutants, and act as carbon sinks (removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere). Wetlands have strong cultural and spiritual importance for Māori. They are a food source (eg eel, whitebait) and provide material for weaving (eg raupō, harakeke (flax)). Draining wetlands for agricultural and urban development over the past 150 years has led to significant wetland loss and deterioration.

Summary report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/fresh-water/analysis-...

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 95347
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 14632
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Livestock numbers, 1994–2017

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4305
83
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Livestock farming is a widespread land use in New Zealand and contributes to our economy. High livestock numbers and the distribution of livestock across land environments can affect indigenous biodiversity and soil health (eg compaction). High livestock numbers and density in some land environments can also affect water quality, as nitrogen and bacteria from urine and faeces can leach into groundwater or run off the land into rivers and lakes.

We measure changes in the numbers of farmed livestock (eg beef and dairy cattle, deer, and sheep) across regions in New Zealand.

Table ID 95344
Data type Table
Row count 2075
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Agricultural and horticultural land use, 2002–16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5231
164
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Dominant land uses in New Zealand include conservation (eg national and forestry parks), forestry (eg for timber resources/wood supply), urban (eg built up areas and open parkland), and agriculture and horticulture. Each land use places different pressures on the land and on receiving environments such as waterways. These pressures can be both positive (eg increased productivity) and negative (eg biodiversity loss and reduced functioning of ecosystems).

This measure reports on agricultural and horticultural land uses by region.

Table ID 95343
Data type Table
Row count 620
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Change in farm size, 2002–16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2928
40
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The area of farms involved in agricultural activities, and how this is changing, is important because agricultural activities can affect soil health and water.

Agricultural activities include beef and sheep, dairy, arable, horticulture, deer, pigs, and other livestock.

Table ID 95342
Data type Table
Row count 584
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Change in farm numbers, 2002–16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3669
38
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The number of farms involved in agricultural activities, and how they are changing, is important because agricultural activities can affect soil health and water.

Agricultural activities include beef and sheep, dairy, arable, horticulture, deer, pigs, and other livestock.

Table ID 95340
Data type Table
Row count 560
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of indigenous land species, 2010–16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3675
28
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

New Zealand has unique indigenous plants and animals that are our national taonga (treasures). Because most are endemic (found nowhere else in the world) New Zealand makes an important contribution to global biodiversity. Biodiversity is important for ecosystem processes, te ao Māori including mahinga kai (customary food gathering), and culture and recreation.

The conservation status of our biodiversity represents their risk of extinction. This data covers the conservation status, and most-recent change in status, of native and resident taxa for which we had sufficient information on abundance and distribution. This includes bats, birds, earthworms, lichens, plants, reptiles and frogs, snails, spiders, and insects.

We also include the number of species that have had a genuine change in conservation status between assessment periods.Where conservation status changed, this measure also looked at the NCTCS listings done in 2012 for birds (Robertson et al, 2017); 2012 for reptiles (Hitchmough et al, 2015); and 2010 for Orthoptera (Trewick et al, 2012). A change in a species’ conservation status reflects a change in its risk of extinction.

For more information on the Department of Conservation’s Threat Classification System (NZTCS) please refer to: www.doc.govt.nz/nztcs

Table ID 95341
Data type Table
Row count 8679
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bird species on public conservation land, estimated abundance 2013–16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3743
19
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The status of our bird communities is an important indicator of the condition of our ecosystems. Many indigenous birds play key ecological roles, including dispersing seeds and pollinating flowers. In some situations, exotic bird species (not indigenous to New Zealand) can partially fulfil these roles. A reduction in the distribution and/or decline in numbers for common and widespread species can equate to large losses of individuals and ecosystem integrity. By measuring the composition of bird communities across public conservation land (forest and non-forest sites) we can monitor how they change over time.

This measure reports on the estimated abundance of seven common bird species on public conservation land, 2013–2016.Common species are species having occupancy over half of public conservation land.

Table ID 95337
Data type Table
Row count 56
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bird species on public conservation land, estimated diversity 2013–16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3525
16
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The status of our bird communities is an important indicator of the condition of our ecosystems. Many indigenous birds play key ecological roles, including dispersing seeds and pollinating flowers. In some situations, exotic bird species (not indigenous to New Zealand) can partially fulfil these roles. A reduction in the distribution and/or decline in numbers for common and widespread species can equate to large losses of individuals and ecosystem integrity. By measuring the composition of bird communities across public conservation land (forest and non–forest sites) we can monitor how they change over time.

This measure reports on the predicted richness (diversity) of bird species on public conservation land, by monitoring site, 2013–2016.

Table ID 95338
Data type Table
Row count 1056
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
Results 1 to 10 of 60