Marine non-indigenous species, all species, all time

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3177
10
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

This data measures the number of detected and established non-indigenous (non-native) species new to New Zealand each year.

Many non-indigenous species arrive in New Zealand waters and have little impact or cannot survive; others establish and have a negative impact on our native habitats and species. Determining that a species has established depends on existing population data, expert taxonomist knowledge, and sites of detection. For example, species are only considered established if detected on natural or permanent artificial habitat (Seaward & Inglis, 2018). Established non-indigenous species can compete with, and prey on, indigenous species, modify natural habitats, and alter ecosystem processes. This can threaten marine biodiversity, our cultural and natural heritage, as well as economic activities, such as commercial and recreational fishing and boating, shellfish harvesting, and aquaculture.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104061
Data type Table
Row count 377
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine non-indigenous species new to New Zealand each year (2009–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4761
11
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Marine non-indigenous (exotic) species arrive in New Zealand waters on the hulls of international vessels (biofouling) or in discharged ballast waters. Some have little impact or cannot survive in New Zealand waters; others have a negative impact on our native habitats and species and become pests. They can compete with, and prey on, indigenous species, modify natural habitats, affect marine industries or can alter ecosystem processes. The potential impact of non-indigenous species on our native habitats and species means they could threaten our cultural and natural heritage, as well as economic activities such as commercial and recreational fishing, shellfish harvesting, and aquaculture.

Table ID 53491
Data type Table
Row count 26
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine litter 2018-2019

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3452
65
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

These data provide a snap shot of beach litter surveys submitted by Citizen Scientist ‘Monitoring Groups’ up to April, 2019. As defined by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP, 2009), marine litter is any persistent, manufactured or processed solid material discarded, disposed of, abandoned or lost in the marine and coastal environment. Marine litter washed onto beaches is one of the most obvious signs of marine pollution, and can have either land or sea-based origins. Land-based sources of marine litter include input from rivers, sewage and storm water outflows, tourism and recreation, illegal dumping, and waste disposal sites. Sea-based sources include commercial shipping, fisheries and aquaculture activities, recreational boating and offshore installations.

UNEP, 2009. Marine Litter: A Global Challenge. Nairobi: UNEP. 232 pp.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104071
Data type Table
Row count 984
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine economy: building consents (2007–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4908
7
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

The marine economy shows the contribution of marine-based economic activities to the New Zealand economy. Measuring the marine economy shows how New Zealand’s marine environment is used to generate economic activity and how this changes over time. However, these activities can also be a source of pressure on New Zealand’s marine environment.
Building consent data on wharves and wharf sheds is used to provide estimates for activity within the marine construction category. Building consents are an estimate, at the time of applying for the consent, of the value of the work to be put in place. For more information, see Statistics New Zealand (2016).

Table ID 53490
Data type Table
Row count 28
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine economy 2007 - 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1667
10
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

The marine economy shows the contribution marine-based economic activities make to the New Zealand economy as measured by gross domestic product (GDP). Measuring the marine economy shows how New Zealand’s marine environment is used to generate economic activity and how this changes over time. However, these activities can be a source of pressure on New Zealand’s marine environment.

Estimates of the marine economy are often used globally as an indicator of the marine environment’s societal and economic importance (Kildow & McIlgorm, 2010; Suris-Regueiro et al, 2013).

This indicator measures the contribution of marine-related industries to New Zealand’s marine economy. Currently measurable activity categories are:

·         offshore minerals
·         shipping
·         fisheries and aquaculture
·         marine services
·         marine tourism and recreation
·         government and defence.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104057
Data type Table
Row count 429
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Long-term average chlorophyll-a concentration, 1997–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4421
23
Added
08 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 08 Feb 2016.

The average concentration of chlorophyll-a (chl-a) in phytoplankton over the period 1997–2014.
Concentrations of chl-a in phytoplankton are used to assess primary productivity in our oceans. Phytoplankton are primary producers of biomass and form the basis of the oceans’ food chains.

Layer ID 52826
Data type Grid
Resolution 5000.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Landings from stocks meeting or exceeding performance thresholds (2009–14)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5094
14
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Our fish stocks are affected by commercial, customary, and recreational fishing, and environmental pressures (eg ocean temperature, acidity, and productivity). The Ministry for Primary Industries uses three performance measures to assess influences on fish stocks: a soft limit (below which a rebuilding plan is required), a hard limit (below which closing a fishery should be considered), and an overfishing threshold (where the rate of extraction is higher than the rate of replenishment).
This dataset relates to the "State of fish stocks" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52514
Data type Table
Row count 51
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Inglis and Seaward 2016 Indicators of non indigenous species in marine systems

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

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911
44
Added
19 Oct 2016

This item was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016

74
Document ID12667
File nameinglis-and-seaward-2016-indicators-of-non-indigenous-species-in-marine-systems.pdf
TypePDF
Size1.54 MB

Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin deaths (1921–2008)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6613
25
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

The Hector’s and Māui’s dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. They are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui’s dolphin is nationally critical. Reporting incidental dolphin deaths from fishing helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of protected species: Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52498
Data type Table
Row count 65
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths (1921–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6698
47
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

The Hector’s and Māui dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. These coastal dolphins are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). Māui dolphins are found on the west coast of the North Island, most often between Maunganui Bluff, north of Dargaville, and New Plymouth. Hector’s dolphins are mostly found around the South Island. Both subspecies are threatened with extinction. The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui dolphin is nationally critical. Dolphins can become entangled in fishing gear used by both commercial and recreational fishers, with set nets posing a particularly high risk. Reporting the bycatch of protected species helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
We report on two aspects of Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths based on data extracted from the Department of Conservation (DOC) Incident Database for 1921–2015: the number of dolphin deaths by cause of death, including a comparison of deaths over 1996–2015; and the number of dolphin deaths from entanglement by type of fishing gear.

Table ID 53475
Data type Table
Row count 561
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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