Nitrate-nitrogen leaching from dairy livestock 2017

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3369
31
Added
17 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Apr 2019.

Raster layer with 100m * 100m pixels, Each pixel represents the estimated nitrate-N leached in kg/ha/yr. This layer contains all nitrate leaching estimated from dairy cows.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 99898
Data type Grid
Resolution 100.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Highly erodible land 2012 South Island

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4958
48
Added
17 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Apr 2019.

This metadata record describes an image of land predicted to be at risk of severe mass movement erosion for the South Island. The image was produced using the Highly Erodible Land model that identifies land at risk to the main forms of mass-movement soil erosion in New Zealand: landsliding, gullying, or earthflow erosion. If the land has protective woody vegetation, then it is not at risk (Dymond et al., 2006). The Highly Erodible Land model identifies five classes of land at risk of erosion: (1) High landslide risk – delivery to stream; (2) high landslide risk – non-delivery to steam; (3) Moderate earthflow risk; (4) Severe earthflow risk; and (5) Gully risk. Landsliding occurs on steep slopes where the soils do not have protective tree roots. The slope angle at which land is considered at risk to landsliding depends on rock strength. Where land is steeper than this slope threshold and does not have woody vegetation, it is considered at risk to landsliding. There is no slope threshold for land at risk to gullying or earthflow erosion. Where land is at risk to gullying or earthflow erosion and does not have woody vegetation, it is considered at risk. The different types of mass-movement soil erosion are not ranked in severity, except for earthflow risk which has extreme and moderate classes of risk. Use: These data provide a regional perspective on land at risk of soil erosion.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 99896
Data type Multi-attribute Grid
Resolution 15.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal water quality trends ten_years REVISED

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

289
8
Added
16 Apr 2019

This item was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019

85

Coastal and estuarine water quality trends (concentration versus time) over a twelve year time period

Document ID21955
File namecoastal-water-quality-trends-ten_years-revised.pdf
TypePDF
Size3.91 MB

River water quality trends, 2008–2017, 1998–2017, and 1990–2017

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

10157
107
Updated
15 Apr 2020

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 15 Apr 2020.

16 April 2020: Subsequent to publication in April 2019 we discovered two small errors with this dataset. These included:

  • Errors in the coordinates of some sites and their associated metadata (such as landcover and elevation).
  • Errors in our calculation of dominant landcover.

In addition, flow data from TopNet has also been updated.

These changes have a minor impact on overall results. These changes have have been corrected, and are republished here, as part of the Our freshwater 2020 release.

This dataset measures how water quality in New Zealand’s rivers is changing over time. It contains nine parameters of water quality based on measurements made at monitored river sites in years 1990-2017:

  • Nitrate-nitrogen
  • Ammoniacal nitrogen
  • Total nitrogen
  • Total phosphorus
  • Dissolved reactive phosphorus
  • Water clarity
  • Turbidity
  • Escherichia coli
  • Macroinvertebrate community index

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Summary report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/fresh-water/water-qua....

Table ID 99883
Data type Table
Row count 9225
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal and estuarine water quality state 1973–2018

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4154
22
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

Data are for 15 measures of coastal water  quality at monitored sites in New Zealand. These 15 measures are dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity, temperature, visual clarity, turbidity, suspended solids, ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrate-nitrite nitrogen, total nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, total phosphorus, faecal coliforms, enterococci, and chlorophyll-a.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Summary report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti....

Table ID 99882
Data type Table
Row count 2058
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal and estuarine water quality trends 2006–2017 and 2008–2017

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3965
16
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

Data are 15 measures of coastal water quality at monitored sites in New Zealand. These 15 measures are dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity, temperature, visual clarity, turbidity, suspended solids, ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrate-nitrite nitrogen, total nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, total phosphorus, faecal coliforms, enterococci, and chlorophyll-a.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Summary report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti....

Table ID 99881
Data type Table
Row count 2594
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Heavy metals in coastal and estuarine sediment 2009 and 2012–2018

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3963
11
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

This indicator measures the concentrations of four heavy metals (lead, copper, zinc and cadmium) against the Australian & New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) guideline values for toxic substances in estuarine sediment.

Heavy metals occur naturally in estuaries, but high concentrations suggest contamination from another source. The metals can be transported along waterways from urban environments (and, for cadmium, from farmland) and accumulate in estuarine and coastal sediments. Heavy metals are toxic although some such as copper and zinc are classed as micro-nutrients at very low concentrations. They accumulate in sediment, where they can be taken up by organisms, and are harmful to species and habitats. They also bio-accumulate (are found in higher concentrations in species further up the food chain).

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99880
Data type Table
Row count 4852
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Livestock numbers 1971–2017

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4949
28
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

This data measures the numbers of farmed livestock (dairy and beef cattle, deer, and sheep) over time across New Zealand.

Livestock farming is a widespread land use in New Zealand and is a large contributor to our economy. High livestock numbers and the distribution of livestock across land environments can affect indigenous biodiversity and soil health (eg through erosion, habitat loss, compaction, and nutrient concentration). Water quality can also be adversely affected, as nutrients, sediment, and bacteria from urine and faeces can leach or run off the land into rivers, lakes, and groundwaters. This can affect the health of the aquatic ecosystem, as well as recreation and cultural values associated with rivers and lakes.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99879
Data type Table
Row count 4240
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Irrigated land 2002 and 2017

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3955
42
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

This dataset shows the total irrigated agricultural land area across New Zealand for 2002 and 2017. Agricultural land irrigated in 2017 is broken down by types of irrigation systems and farm type.

Although it enables and improves farming, irrigation can also have adverse consequences relating to recreation, and can increase pollution and leaching of contaminants into waterways. Irrigation can affect the natural form and character of land (eg dry land to greener and wetter land), fishing, cultivation and food production, animal drinking water, water supply, commercial and industrial water use, and hydro-electric power generation. More irrigated land, and more water abstraction, can place increased pressure on river flows, as well as indirectly increasing pressure on land and fresh water by enabling increased agricultural intensity.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99878
Data type Table
Row count 36
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Highly erodible land 2012

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5143
23
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

The data identifies five classes of land in New Zealand at risk of erosion:

  1. high landslide risk – delivery to stream
  2. high landslide risk – non-delivery to steam
  3. moderate earthflow risk
  4. severe earthflow risk
  5. gully risk

Landslide erosion is the shallow (approximately 1m) and sudden failure of soil slopes during storm rainfall. Earthflow erosion is the slow downward movement (approximately 1m/year) of wet soil slopes towards waterways. Gully erosion is massive soil erosion that begins at gully heads and expands up hillsides over decadal time scales.

Erosion can have negative consequences on land productivity, water quality (via increased sedimentation and turbidity), the natural form of the land, and infrastructure.

New Zealand experiences high rates of soil erosion. In the North Island, this is mostly due to the historical clearance of forest for agriculture (see also Estimated long-term soil erosion). In contrast, erosion in the South Island is mostly due to natural processes, primarily high rainfall and steep mountain slopes.

It is important to identify areas of land at risk of severe erosion to inform land-use decisions and help prioritise regional soil conservation work.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99877
Data type Table
Row count 240
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
Results 71 to 80 of 871