Annual sea surface temperature difference from normal, 2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5952
9
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The oceans store most of the excess energy accumulated due to increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere warming the surface layer. These long-term increases in temperature caused by climate change are in addition to natural variability where ocean temperatures change in response to climate oscillations like the El Niño Southern Oscillation.
Changes in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, environments, and species. Some species may shift range or find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions. Warmer water also takes up more space, which contributes to sea-level rise.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89395
Data type Grid
Resolution About 4548.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual sea surface temperature difference from normal, 2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

7082
18
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The oceans store most of the excess energy accumulated due to increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere warming the surface layer. These long-term increases in temperature caused by climate change are in addition to natural variability where ocean temperatures change in response to climate oscillations like the El Niño Southern Oscillation.
Changes in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, environments, and species. Some species may shift range or find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions. Warmer water also takes up more space, which contributes to sea-level rise.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89396
Data type Grid
Resolution About 4548.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Anomaly PED, 2013/14–2015/16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6219
5
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. As our climate changes, increasing temperatures and rainfall pattern changes are expected to increase PED, and the frequency and intensity of drought, particularly in currently drought-prone regions.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89483
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Area of coastal seabed trawled by depth class (2008–12)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6844
12
Added
25 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging, when fishing nets or dredges are towed near and along the seabed, can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed, shading (in shallow waters) or smothering marine species. This measure focuses on coastal areas (waters shallower than 250m). Focusing on coastal benthic habitats is important as these face multiple threats (for example from land-based activities) in addition to fishing.

Table ID 53510
Data type Table
Row count 3
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Area of coastal seabed trawled by BOMEC class (2008–12)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6754
11
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging, when fishing nets or dredges are towed near and along the seabed, can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed, shading (in shallow waters) or smothering marine species. This measure focuses on coastal areas (waters shallower than 250m). Focusing on coastal benthic habitats is important as these face multiple threats (for example, from land-based activities) in addition to fishing

Table ID 53484
Data type Table
Row count 33
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Area of seabed trawled by BOMEC habitat classes (1990–2011)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

8090
12
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging (where fishing gear is towed near or along the ocean floor) can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. These fishing methods can also stir up sediment from the seabed, creating sediment plumes that can smother sensitive species. Recovery times for affected habitats and species depend on their sensitivity and the area affected by trawling or dredging. Bottom trawling is carried out on or near the seabed in both shallow and deep waters. Dredging is carried out on the seabed in shallow waters and targets marine creatures such as scallops. This measure focuses on deepwater areas (waters deeper than 200m).

Table ID 53488
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Area of seabed trawled by depth class (1990–2011)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6919
11
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging (where fishing gear is towed near or along the ocean floor) can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. These fishing methods can also stir up sediment from the seabed, creating sediment plumes that can smother sensitive species. Recovery times for affected habitats and species depend on their sensitivity and the area affected by trawling or dredging. Bottom trawling is carried out on or near the seabed in both shallow and deep waters. Dredging is carried out on the seabed in shallow waters and targets marine creatures such as scallops. This measure focuses on deepwater areas (waters deeper than 200m).

Table ID 53486
Data type Table
Row count 4
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Asset value of water resources used for hydroelectric generation, 2007–15

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

8440
10
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Water is an important source of energy that contributes to New Zealand’s energy supply and the economy. As the main source of renewable energy in New Zealand, the use of water supports the production of the electricity industry. Tracking the value of this water as a natural resource – along with land form, slope, and elevation, which all help to generate hydroelectricity – shows the economic benefits derived from water use for current and future generations. Changes in flow regimes and climate can affect these values.

We report on the value of water resources used to generate hydroelectricity. This value includes both the returns received from current use (resource rent), and expected benefits from future use (the asset value).

Table ID 53615
Data type Table
Row count 54
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Atmospheric ozone, 1979 - 2019, state

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3239
5
Added
14 Oct 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2020.

DATA SOURCE: National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)
[Technical report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti...]

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

Dataset used to develop the "Atmospheric ozone" indicator [available at www.stats.govtnz/indicators/atmospheric-ozone]

This indicator measures the thickness of total column ozone in Dobson Units observed above Lauder, Otago. We report minimum, average, and maximum annual total column ozone for each year from 1979 to 2019. We also report minimum, average, and maximum daily average column ozone by day of year from 1979 to 2019.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 105050
Data type Table
Row count 1464
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Atmospheric ozone, 1979 - 2019, trends

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3282
2
Added
14 Oct 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2020.

DATA SOURCE: National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)
[Technical report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti...]

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

Dataset used to develop the "Atmospheric ozone" indicator [available at www.stats.govtnz/indicators/atmospheric-ozone]

This indicator measures the thickness of total column ozone in Dobson Units observed above Lauder, Otago. We report minimum, average, and maximum annual total column ozone for each year from 1979 to 2019, and trends. We also report minimum, average, and maximum daily average column ozone by day of year from 1979 to 2019.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 105051
Data type Table
Row count 6
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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