Cultural Health Index scores for waterways, 2005–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5559
32
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Cultural Health Index scores for a waterway is a combination measure of historical cultural use and access, mahinga kai assessment, and water quality assessment from a cultural perspective of a site on a waterway.

The Cultural Health Index scores compile this information into a classification system to provide an overall grading of the state of a site and how the state of a site on a waterway affects the mauri, the ability for tangata whenua to feed the hapu and iwi and the overall water quality for the site. These are all important indicators of the cultural health of a waterway, and are also a consideration for other cultural and recreational activities like karakia, cleansing, swimming and wading.

Table ID 53617
Data type Table
Row count 42
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

He Pātaka Wai Ora Report_datasheet raw water quality

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5578
8
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Table ID 53611
Data type Table
Row count 796
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated contemporary and pre-human wetland area, by type (2008 estimate)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5465
43
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

Wetlands support unique biodiversity and provide important services. They clean water of excess nutrients and sediment, help absorb floodwaters, and act as carbon sinks (remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere). They also have cultural importance for Māori, and provide valuable food and materials (eg flax). Draining wetlands for agricultural and urban development over the past 150 years has significantly reduced their extent, leading to a loss of biodiversity and natural function. This dataset contains estimates of the national extent of the different types of wetlands in contempary and pre-human times.

This dataset relates to the "Wetland extent" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52541
Data type Table
Row count 14
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Urban stream water quality - trends - 2008–15

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5465
29
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Urban water quality indicators include heavy metals, nutrients, and E.coli. The concentrations of these indicators are compared to the proportion of urban land cover in catchments.

Zinc and copper are heavy metals that can accumulate in sediments, shellfish, and other aquatic organisms. Metals can reach toxic levels in organisms making them unsafe to eat and can be toxic to aquatic life. Nitrogen and phosphorus are nutrients that can cause excessive algal growth. Ammonical nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen can be toxic to aquatic life if concentrations in streams are high enough. E.coli is an indicator of disease-causing organisms, which may affect human health and recreational values in streams.

File contains trend analyses by site for water quality indicators in Auckland, Wellington, and Christchurch over the period 2008–15.

Table ID 53598
Data type Table
Row count 217
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Predicted E.coli concentrations in rivers, 1990–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5426
28
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

River water quality is valued for many reasons including recreational value.
Escherichia coli (E.coli) can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces, which can cause illness.

File contains the model outputs for E.coli concentrations as four different statistics for each river segment in New Zealand’s digital river network.

Table ID 53603
Data type Table
Row count 570577
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lake water quality state 2013–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5427
27
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

This dataset contains ten lake water quality variables based on measurements made at monitored lake sites: chlorophyll-a, nitrate-nitrogen, total nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, total phosphorus, Escherichia coli, water clarity, and lake trophic level index (TLI3 and TLI4). This dataset includes: - Median values for the period 2013 to 2017 - For selected indicators, how these values compare to the National Objectives Framework (NOF) (MfE, 2017) bands related to ecosystem health When nitrogen and phosphorus accumulate above certain concentrations in lakes (referred to as ‘nutrient enrichment’), they can stimulate excessive growth of algae and cyanobacteria. Chlorophyll-a is a measure of the phytoplankton (algae) biomass. The lake trophic level index (TLI) indicates the health of a lake based on concentrations of three variables:
· total nitrogen
· total phosphorus
· chlorophyll-a.
Water clarity is a measure of underwater visibility. Lakes with poor clarity and TLI are poor habitats for some species of animals and plants, and they may not be suitable for recreation. Ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to aquatic life if concentrations are high enough.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Summary report available at: www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/fresh-water/water-qua....

Table ID 99872
Data type Table
Row count 454
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Urban water quality - state - 2013–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5422
29
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Urban water quality indicators include heavy metals, nutrients, and E.coli. The concentrations of these indicators are compared to the proportion of urban land cover in catchments.

Heavy metals have the ability to accumulate in sediments, shellfish, and other aquatic organisms. Metals can reach toxic levels in organisms making them unsafe to consume and can be toxic to aquatic life. Nutrients can cause excessive algal growth and E.coli has the ability to make people sick while they are swimming if concentrations are high enough. Rivers with poor water quality are rarely suitable for recreation and provide poor habitats for aquatic species.

File contains data analysis of medians and percentiles by site for water quality indicators, and includes the proportion of urban land cover in catchments in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch over the period 2013–2015.

Table ID 53597
Data type Table
Row count 379
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Stream bed sedimentation - predicted cover in all river reaches nationwide

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5372
50
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

Fine sediment is the collective term for inorganic particles smaller than 2mm that are deposited on the beds of rivers and streams. Urban development, agriculture, and plantation forestry around waterways can increase the amount of sediment entering river systems. Sediment can clog the spaces between pebbles used by aquatic insects and fish, and degrade food sources and sites used for egg laying. Excessive sedimentation can also affect the suitability of rivers and streams for recreation.

Predictions of the proportion of deposited fine sediment cover are provided for every river reach in the River Environment Classification. These were calculated via a regression model using the measured proportion of fine sediment cover, slope of the river, climate and catchment land cover.

NZREACH = River location ID from the River Environment Classification
pred_obs = predicted contemporary percent fine sediment cover
pred_expec = predicted pre-human percent fine sediment cover

This dataset relates to the "Stream bed sedimentation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52540
Data type Table
Row count 576276
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrate leaching from livestock time series 1990–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5313
54
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

We report on trends in nitrate-nitrogen from livestock that has leached from soil per year across New Zealand since 1990.

Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth. It occurs naturally, but in agricultural systems more nitrogen is commonly added to soils as fertiliser or as urine or dung from livestock. Not all the additional nitrogen can be used by plants and microorganisms, so some nitrate-nitrogen may leach (drain) from the soil. Livestock urine is the dominant source of nitrate-nitrogen leached from soil. Leached nitrate-nitrogen can enter groundwater and waterways, potentially causing ecological harm. The amount of nitrate-nitrogen leaching from the soil varies around the country as a result of different land uses, climates, and soils.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Summary report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/fresh-water/spatial-n...

Table ID 99876
Data type Table
Row count 2016
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Mean fish IBI score for all river sites, by river environment classification land cover class, 1970-2007

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5241
22
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

Freshwater fish are an important component of freshwater ecosystems and a valued resource for Māori and recreational fishers. The community of fish species found at a site can be affected by changes in catchment land cover and land use, in-stream habitat, fish passages (routes for moving up and down waterways), pests, and contaminants. The fish index of biotic integrity (IBI) is a measure of the condition of fish communities at sites across the country.

This dataset relates to the "Freshwater fish communities" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52544
Data type Table
Row count 35
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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