Units: percentage of normal sunshine hours 1976

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3156
1
Added
15 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Feb 2016.

"Sunshine is important for our health and recreation, and for the environment. It is also important for our agriculture-based economy, for example, for plant growth.

This layer shows percentage of normal sunshine hours across New Zealand for 1976 as part of the data series for years 1972 to 2013. Data is for a calendar year (January–December).

The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) mapped mean annual sunshine hours from the virtual climate station network data (NIWA) generated from data in its National Climate Database, for the period 1981–2013. It generated the Units: percentage of normal by comparing the annual average to the long-term mean for 1981–2010.

This dataset relates to the "Sunshine hours in New Zealand" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: raster catalogue
Unit: hrs/yr"

Layer ID 53185
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Units: percentage of normal sunshine hours 1975

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2644
1
Added
15 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Feb 2016.

"Sunshine is important for our health and recreation, and for the environment. It is also important for our agriculture-based economy, for example, for plant growth.

This layer shows percentage of normal sunshine hours across New Zealand for 1975 as part of the data series for years 1972 to 2013. Data is for a calendar year (January–December).

The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) mapped mean annual sunshine hours from the virtual climate station network data (NIWA) generated from data in its National Climate Database, for the period 1981–2013. It generated the Units: percentage of normal by comparing the annual average to the long-term mean for 1981–2010.

This dataset relates to the "Sunshine hours in New Zealand" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: raster catalogue
Unit: hrs/yr"

Layer ID 53184
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Units: percentage of normal sunshine hours 1974

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3269
1
Added
15 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Feb 2016.

"Sunshine is important for our health and recreation, and for the environment. It is also important for our agriculture-based economy, for example, for plant growth.

This layer shows percentage of normal sunshine hours across New Zealand for 1974 as part of the data series for years 1972 to 2013. Data is for a calendar year (January–December).

The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) mapped mean annual sunshine hours from the virtual climate station network data (NIWA) generated from data in its National Climate Database, for the period 1981–2013. It generated the Units: percentage of normal by comparing the annual average to the long-term mean for 1981–2010.

This dataset relates to the "Sunshine hours in New Zealand" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: raster catalogue
Unit: hrs/yr"

Layer ID 53183
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Units: percentage of normal sunshine hours 1973

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3208
1
Added
15 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Feb 2016.

"Sunshine is important for our health and recreation, and for the environment. It is also important for our agriculture-based economy, for example, for plant growth.

This layer shows percentage of normal sunshine hours across New Zealand for 1973 as part of the data series for years 1972 to 2013. Data is for a calendar year (January–December).

The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) mapped mean annual sunshine hours from the virtual climate station network data (NIWA) generated from data in its National Climate Database, for the period 1981–2013. It generated the Units: percentage of normal by comparing the annual average to the long-term mean for 1981–2010.

This dataset relates to the "Sunshine hours in New Zealand" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: raster catalogue
Unit: hrs/yr"

Layer ID 53182
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Units: percentage of normal sunshine hours 1972

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3231
0
Added
15 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Feb 2016.

"Sunshine is important for our health and recreation, and for the environment. It is also important for our agriculture-based economy, for example, for plant growth.

This layer shows percentage of normal sunshine hours across New Zealand for 1972 as part of the data series for years 1972 to 2013. Data is for a calendar year (January–December).

The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) mapped mean annual sunshine hours from the virtual climate station network data (NIWA) generated from data in its National Climate Database, for the period 1981–2013. It generated the Units: percentage of normal by comparing the annual average to the long-term mean for 1981–2010.

This dataset relates to the "Sunshine hours in New Zealand" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: raster catalogue
Unit: hrs/yr"

Layer ID 53181
Data type Grid
Resolution 5110.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in total sunshine hours, 1972–2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3724
14
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Trends in total sunshine hours, 1972–2016.
Sunshine is essential for our mental and physical well–being and plant growth. It is also important for tourism and recreation.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89444
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in percent of annual rainfall in the 95th percentile (r95ptot), 1960–2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3687
7
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Trends in percent of annual rainfall in the 95th percentile (r95ptot), 1960–2016.
Intense rainfall can result in flash floods or land slips that damage homes and property, disrupt transportation, and endanger lives. It can also interfere with recreation and increase erosion. Changes to the frequency of intense rainfall events can alter biodiversity.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89434
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in PED, 1972/3–2015/6

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3893
2
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Trends in potential evapostranspiration deficit (PED), 1972–2016.
Soil moisture is vital for plant growth. When plants cannot access the water they need, growth is reduced, affecting crops and food for livestock, and native biodiversity. Over a sustained period, a drought can have significant social and economic costs, particularly for rural communities.
Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. PED is measured in growing seasons (the 12 months from 1 July to 30 June of the following year. Data covers each of the growing seasons from 1 July 1972, with the last growing season in the series ending on 30 June 2016.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89438
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in peak UV index value, 1981–2017

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3904
5
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Trends in daily peak UV index values at Invercargill, Lauder (Otago region), Christchurch, Paraparaumu (Wellington region), and Leigh (Auckland region). The strength of UV light is expressed as a solar UV index, starting from 0 (no UV) to 11+ (extreme).
Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light helps our bodies make vitamin D, which we need for healthy bones and muscles. However, too much exposure to UV light can cause skin cancer. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, and monitoring UV levels helps us understand the occurrence of skin cancer.
Ozone in the upper atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s UV light, protecting us from harmful levels. The amount of UV radiation reaching the ground varies in relation to changes in the atmospheric ozone concentrations. The Antarctic ozone hole lies well to the south of New Zealand and does not have a large effect on New Zealand’s ozone concentrations.
The trend was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89469
Data type Table
Row count 5
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in ozone concentrations, 1978–2017

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3882
5
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

NIWA supplied ozone data in two forms, with different starting dates:
- measurements made using a Dobson spectrophotometer (number 72), from 1987
- data assimilated from satellite measurements recalibrated against the global Dobson network, from 1978.
NIWA takes measurements using the Dobson spectrophotometer 72 under clear-sky, direct sunlight conditions at Lauder in Otago. There are gaps in the time series due to days with cloud, rain, or too much wind. However, over the whole period, each individual calendar day of the year was measured. This allows us to calculate statistics based on the day of the year.
The trend was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89465
Data type Table
Row count 3
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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