Ground-level ozone seasonal trends, 2011-2020

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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102
1
Added
13 Oct 2021

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2021.

Ground-level (tropospheric) ozone (O3) exists at a natural background level but is also produced when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds from vehicle emissions, petrol fumes, industrial processes solvents, and other human-made sources react in the presence of heat and sunlight. It is the primary component of photochemical smog. Ozone also occurs naturally in the stratosphere, where it protects us from ultraviolet radiation – this ozone occasionally can mix downwards to ground level.

Ozone is a colourless, odourless gas. Exposure to high concentrations of ozone can cause respiratory health problems and is linked to cardiovascular health problems and increased mortality. Those most at risk include people with asthma, children, older adults, and people who are active outdoors, such as outdoor workers. People with certain genetic characteristics and nutrient deficiencies are also at greater risk from ozone exposure. Ozone can also affect sensitive vegetation and ecosystems and can cause damage during the growing season.

This dataset reports on the seasonal trends assessed for the period 2011-2020.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 106238
Data type Table
Row count 4
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Health effects from PM10 2006 and 2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5386
11
Added
15 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 is of particular concern because of high concentrations in some areas. It can also damage health, with associated effects ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer. This indicator considers PM10 from human-made sources, such as burning wood or coal for home heating or road motor vehicle emissions.

We report on the estimated number of premature deaths, hospitalisations, and restricted activity days for the New Zealand population from exposure to PM10 from human activities.

• Premature deaths are deaths, often preventable, that occur before a person reaches the age they were expected to live to.
• Hospitalisations relate to hospitalisations for respiratory and cardiac illnesses (not including cases leading to premature death).
• Restricted activity days occur when symptoms are sufficient to limit usual activities such as work or study.

This dataset relates to the "Health effects from exposure to PM10" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52598
Data type Table
Row count 18
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 is of particular concern because of high concentrations in some areas. It can also damage health, with associated effects ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer. This indicator considers PM10 from human-made sources, such as burning wood or coal for home heating or road motor vehicle emissions.

We report on the estimated number of premature deaths, hospitalisations, and restricted activity days for the New Zealand population (per 100,000 people) from exposure to PM10 from human activities.

• Premature deaths are deaths, often preventable, that occur before a person reaches the age they were expected to live to.
• Hospitalisations relate to hospitalisations for respiratory and cardiac illnesses (not including cases leading to premature death).
• Restricted activity days occur when symptoms are sufficient to limit usual activities such as work or study.

This dataset relates to the "Health effects from exposure to PM10" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

The Health effects from PM10: 2012 updated HAPINZ model can be found at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/KJdi75 and the updated exposure model can be found at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/wgSS3a on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).

Table ID 52597
Data type Table
Row count 6
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Health impacts of PM10, 2006 & 2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6462
16
Added
17 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Oct 2018.

PM10 (particulate matter less than 10 micrometres in diameter) comprises solid and liquid particles in the air. PM10 can be inhaled and the largest particles in this size fraction are deposited in the upper airways, while the smaller ones can deposit deep in the lungs. Children, the elderly, and people with existing heart or lung problems have a higher risk of health effects from PM10 exposure. Health effects include decreased lung function or heart attack, and mortality.
We report on the modelled number of premature deaths for adults (30+ years), hospitalisations, and restricted activity days for people of all ages for years 2006 and 2016 only. The model only includes impacts that result from exposure to PM10 that comes from human activities.
We focus on PM10 from human activities because these sources can be managed, unlike PM from natural sources such as sea salt.
• Premature deaths are those, often preventable, occurring before a person reaches the age they could be expected to live to.
• Hospitalisations relate to those for respiratory and cardiac illnesses (not including cases leading to premature death).
• Restricted activity days occur when symptoms are sufficient to limit usual activities such as work or study. These days aren’t shared evenly across the population – people with asthma or other respiratory conditions would likely have more restricted activity days.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98462
Data type Table
Row count 12
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Heavy metal concentrations, 2002–17

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5941
29
Added
15 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2018.

Inhaling particulate matter (PM) containing heavy metals can cause serious health effects (World Health Organization (WHO), 2013). Airborne arsenic is linked to lung cancers (WHO, 2013), and heart, liver, kidney, and nerve damage (Caussy, 2003). Nickel and vanadium are linked to lung and nasal sinus cancers. Lead can impair cognitive function in children and affect an adult’s cardiovascular system, even at low blood levels (WHO, 2013).
Heavy metals are also toxic to other organisms, and can bioaccumulate in animals, especially in aquatic ecosystems (Rahman, Hasegawa, & Lim, 2012). We don’t know how much airborne heavy metal is deposited in New Zealand.
We report on the concentrations of arsenic, lead, and vanadium in PM10 (PM 10 micrometres or less in diameter) from 2007-16 at Henderson – Auckland which were measured using a method directly comparable to relevant guidelines. We also report on arsenic, nickel, lead, and vanadium concentrations at 5 Auckland sites from 2005–16 that were measured using a method which cannot be directly compared to relevant guidelines but provides information on concentrations.
Arsenic is emitted when burning wood treated with copper chromium arsenic preservative (eg building project offcuts). A 2012 Auckland study showed that 17 percent of households may burn such wood (Stones-Havas, 2014).
Lead is emitted from burning wood coated with lead-based paint, by removing lead-based paint from buildings without proper safety precautions, and from industrial discharges (eg at metal smelters). In New Zealand, airborne nickel and vanadium concentrations are highest near ports and are associated with combustion exhaust from ships (Davy & Trompetter, 2018). Monitoring for lead has been limited since the fall in ambient lead concentrations after New Zealand’s petrol became lead free in 1996.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98416
Data type Table
Row count 19077
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Home heating emission inventory and other sources evaluation (2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2287
211
Added
15 Oct 2015

This item was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2015

72
Document ID11670
File namehome-heating-emission-inventory-and-other-sources-evaluation-2015.pdf
TypePDF
Size1.63 MB

Home Heating Inventory data 2006 and 2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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771
115
Added
30 Sep 2015

This item was first added to MfE Data Service on 30 Sep 2015

Document ID11220
File namehome-heating-inventory-data-2006-and-2013.xlsx
TypeXLSX
Size5.65 MB

Lead concentrations 2005–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5249
10
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Lead is a heavy metal. Airborne sources include some industrial discharges, such as at metal smelters and the removal of lead-based paint from buildings without proper safety precautions. Lead can harm the nervous system and hearing, and impair mental development. Before 1996, when petrol became lead free, some New Zealand sites experienced elevated lead concentrations.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Lead concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52453
Data type Table
Row count 9
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

National PM10 concentrations - complex excel

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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650
110
Added
15 Oct 2015

This item was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2015

Document ID11667
File namenational-pm10-concentrations-complex-excel.xlsx
TypeXLSX
Size39.5 KB

National PM10 concentrations 2006–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7860
57
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of PM10 include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main human-made source of PM10.

PM10 is of particular concern because it is found in high concentrations in some areas and can damage health. It is associated with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "PM10 annual average concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52442
Data type Table
Row count 8
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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