Average annual PED, 2015/16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1023
1
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. As our climate changes, increasing temperatures and rainfall pattern changes are expected to increase PED, and the frequency and intensity of drought, particularly in currently drought-prone regions.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 89486
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual sea surface temperature difference from normal, 2004

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1742
0
Added
11 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Feb 2016.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. Some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.

This layer shows annual sea-surface temperature difference from normal for 2004 as part of the data series for years 1993 to 2013. "Normal" is defined as the average sea-surface temperature for 1993–2013.

NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately 6-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom and Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.

This dataset relates to the "Annual average sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: grid

Unit: percent

Further information can be found in:

Uddstrom, MJ (2003). Lessons from high-resolution satellite SSTs. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 84(7), 896–897.

Uddstrom, MJ, & Oien, NA (1999). On the use of high resolution satellite data to describe the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface temperatures in the New Zealand region. Journal of Geophysical Research (Oceans) 104, chapter 9, 20729–20751.

Layer ID 53032
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution About 1927.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Melanoma registration rates, by age, 1996–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1000
3
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

This csv reports melanoma registration rates, per 100,000 population, by age. Age is grouped in 5 year segments (eg 0–4 years old, 5–9 years old).
New Zealand and Australia have the world’s highest rates of melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer. Melanoma is mainly caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, usually from the sun. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, especially during summer.
The risk of developing melanoma is affected by factors such as skin colour and type, family history, and the amount of sun exposure. Melanoma can affect people at any age, but the chance of developing a melanoma increases with age. We report on age-standardised rates of melanoma to account for the increasing proportion of older people in our population.
Our data on melanoma registrations come from the New Zealand Cancer Registry and the Ministry of Health's Mortality Collection. The passing of the Cancer Registry Act 1993 and Cancer Registry Regulations 1994 led to significant improvements in data quality and coverage (Ministry of Health, 2013). A sharp increase in registrations after 1993 is likely to have been related to these legislative and regulatory changes; for this reason we have only analysed data from 1996.
2014–15 data are provisional and subject to change.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89482
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Seamount closures (2016 report)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1690
13
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

New Zealand’s four million km2 marine environment is diverse, with a range of coastal habitats and offshore seabed environments. There are also many marine species unique to New Zealand. Marine protected areas conserve or manage some of these unique habitats and species, while a range of other tools also provide marine protection. We report on the area covered by these tools as an indirect measure to understand the state of the marine environment.
Seamount (underwater mountain area) closures are one of the marine protection tools used. They are designated areas in the exclusive economic zone, which extends to the 200 nautical mile limit. Seamount closures protect underwater mountain areas through the prohibition of all trawling activity. There are some areas where seamount closures overlap with benthic protection areas. In these cases the seamount closure restrictions apply.

Layer ID 53496
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 17
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin deaths (1921–2008)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1379
17
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

The Hector’s and Māui’s dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. They are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui’s dolphin is nationally critical. Reporting incidental dolphin deaths from fishing helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of protected species: Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52498
Data type Table
Row count 65
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Land cover, Area of land cover, 1996, 2001, 2008, and 2012

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1420
40
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Land cover describes the extent of vegetation, water bodies, built environment, and bare natural surfaces (eg gravel and rock) across New Zealand. Measuring the composition and changes in land cover can help us better understand the pressures that different land uses are placing on the biodiversity and functioning of ecosystems.

Column headings:
area_ha = area of land cover measured in hectares

This dataset relates to the "Land cover" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52478
Data type Table
Row count 884
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrogen dioxide concentrations and exceedances

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1397
30
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a gas. It can be emitted directly into the air but is most often formed when nitric oxide (NO) emissions react with other chemicals in the air. Nationally, road motor vehicles are the main human-made source of nitrogen oxides (NOx, the collective term for NO2 and NO). NO2 may cause respiratory infections and reduced lung development and functioning.

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitric oxide (NO) (collectively known as nitrogen oxides, NOx) are emitted from the combustion of fossil fuels and from natural sources such as volcanoes. The four main human-made sources of key pollutants in New Zealand are burning wood or coal for home heating, road motor vehicle use, industry, and household outdoor burning.

Column units:
- Disp_graph column: 1= displayed on graph; 0 = not displayed on graph
- Variable column: mg_m3 = micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Regional council and unitary authority monitoring of nitrogen dioxide" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52457
Data type Table
Row count 594
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual sea surface temperature difference from normal, 2003

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

967
0
Added
12 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Feb 2016.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. Some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.

This layer shows annual sea-surface temperature difference from normal for 2003 as part of the data series for years 1993 to 2013. "Normal" is defined as the average sea-surface temperature for 1993–2013.

NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately 6-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom and Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.

This dataset relates to the "Annual average sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: grid

Unit: percent

Further information can be found in:

Uddstrom, MJ (2003). Lessons from high-resolution satellite SSTs. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 84(7), 896–897.

Uddstrom, MJ, & Oien, NA (1999). On the use of high resolution satellite data to describe the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface temperatures in the New Zealand region. Journal of Geophysical Research (Oceans) 104, chapter 9, 20729–20751.

Layer ID 53171
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution About 1927.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine reserves (2014)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1363
27
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand’s four million km2 marine environment is diverse, with a range of coastal habitats and offshore seabed environments. We also have many marine species found only in New Zealand. Marine protected areas conserve or manage some of these unique habitats and species, while a range of other tools also provide marine protection. We report on the area covered by marine reserves as an indirect measure to understand the state of the marine environment.

Table ID 52518
Data type Table
Row count 28
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Monthly El Niño Southern Oscillation Index, 1986–2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1645
33
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the movement of warm equatorial water across the Pacific Ocean and the atmospheric response. It occurs every 2–7 years, typically lasting 6–18 months. ENSO has three phases: neutral, El Niño and La Niña. In New Zealand an El Niño phase in summer can bring increased westerly winds, more rain in the west, and drought in the east; in winter it can lead to more cool southerly winds. During a La Niña phase we may experience more north-easterly winds, wetter conditions in the north and east, and higher sea levels.
This dataset relates to monthly ENSO values.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89381
Data type Table
Row count 372
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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