Gas and particulate matter emissions 2001–2013

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5809
149
Added
09 Dec 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 09 Dec 2015.

"This dataset shows estimated annual emissions for different pollutants (tonnes per square kilometre): Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10); Particulate matter 2.5 micrometres or less in diameter (PM2.5); Sulphur dioxide; Sulphur Oxides (SOx); Carbon Monoxide (CO), and; Nitrogen Oxides (NOx).

Measures of:
- PM10 and PM2.5 are from home heating
- SOx are from Industrial sources
- CO and NOx are from road motor vehicles.

Data for PM10 (PM10_t_km_yr_) and PM2.5 (PM25_t_km_yr_) are provided for 2006 and 2013, including percent difference (PM10_PC_difference) and (PM25_PC_difference).

Data for CO (MV_CO_t_km_yr_) and NOx (MV_NOx_t_km_yr_) are provided for 2001 and 2013, include percent difference (MV_CO_PC_diff_01_13) and NOx (MV_NOx_PC_diff_01_13).

Data for SOx is for 2013 only (I_SOx_t_km_yr_2013).

Data is broken down by territorial authority area.

This dataset relates to various Environmental measurse on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website: home heating; road motor vehicle emissions, and industrial emissions.

Geometry: Polygons

Units: t/km/yr"

Layer ID 52666
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 68
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W)

Annual average sea surface temperature, 2007

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6152
5
Added
11 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Feb 2016.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. Some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.

This layer shows annual average sea surface temperature for 2007 as part of the data series for years 1993 to 2013.

NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately 6-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom and Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.

This dataset relates to the "Annual average sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: grid
Unit: degrees Celsius

Further information can be found in:
Uddstrom, MJ (2003). Lessons from high-resolution satellite SSTs. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 84(7), 896–897.
Uddstrom, MJ, & Oien, NA (1999). On the use of high resolution satellite data to describe the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface temperatures in the New Zealand region. Journal of Geophysical Research (Oceans) 104, chapter 9, 20729–20751.

Layer ID 53099
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution 2000.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual average sea surface temperature, 2005

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6155
4
Added
11 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Feb 2016.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. Some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.

This layer shows annual average sea surface temperature for 2005 as part of the data series for years 1993 to 2013.

NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately 6-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom and Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.

This dataset relates to the "Annual average sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: grid
Unit: degrees Celsius

Further information can be found in:
Uddstrom, MJ (2003). Lessons from high-resolution satellite SSTs. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 84(7), 896–897.
Uddstrom, MJ, & Oien, NA (1999). On the use of high resolution satellite data to describe the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface temperatures in the New Zealand region. Journal of Geophysical Research (Oceans) 104, chapter 9, 20729–20751.

Layer ID 53097
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution 2000.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual average sea surface temperature, 1996

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6262
4
Added
11 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Feb 2016.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. Some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.

This layer shows annual average sea surface temperature for 1996 as part of the data series for years 1993 to 2013.

NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately 6-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom and Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.

This dataset relates to the ""Annual average sea-surface temperature"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: grid
Unit: degrees Celsius

Further information can be found in:
Uddstrom, MJ (2003). Lessons from high-resolution satellite SSTs. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 84(7), 896–897.
Uddstrom, MJ, & Oien, NA (1999). On the use of high resolution satellite data to describe the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface temperatures in the New Zealand region. Journal of Geophysical Research (Oceans) 104, chapter 9, 20729–20751.

Layer ID 53046
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution 2000.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand's greenhouse gas emissions (1990–2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6258
80
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are small compared with those of other developed nations, but we have committed to being part of the global response to climate change. New Zealand's greenhouse gas inventory is an annual report on all of the country’s human-induced GHG emissions and removals of GHG emissions. The inventory is produced as part of our obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol.
Some GHG emissions are removed, primarily by forests. Net emissions represent the total amount of gas contributed to the atmosphere but gross emmissions are also provided for New Zealand.
This dataset relates to the "New Zealand's greenhouse gas emissions" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52565
Data type Table
Row count 24
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual average sea surface temperature, 1998

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6236
4
Added
11 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Feb 2016.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. Some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.

This layer shows annual average sea surface temperature for 1998 as part of the data series for years 1993 to 2013.

NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately 6-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom and Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.

This dataset relates to the "Annual average sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: grid
Unit: degrees Celsius

Further information can be found in:
Uddstrom, MJ (2003). Lessons from high-resolution satellite SSTs. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 84(7), 896–897.
Uddstrom, MJ, & Oien, NA (1999). On the use of high resolution satellite data to describe the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface temperatures in the New Zealand region. Journal of Geophysical Research (Oceans) 104, chapter 9, 20729–20751.

Layer ID 53048
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution 2000.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual sea surface temperature difference from normal, 1997

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6409
1
Added
12 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Feb 2016.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. Some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.

This layer shows annual sea-surface temperature difference from normal for 1997 as part of the data series for years 1993 to 2013. "Normal" is defined as the average sea-surface temperature for 1993–2013.

NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately 6-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom and Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.

This dataset relates to the "Annual average sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: grid

Unit: percent

Further information can be found in:

Uddstrom, MJ (2003). Lessons from high-resolution satellite SSTs. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 84(7), 896–897.

Uddstrom, MJ, & Oien, NA (1999). On the use of high resolution satellite data to describe the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface temperatures in the New Zealand region. Journal of Geophysical Research (Oceans) 104, chapter 9, 20729–20751.

Layer ID 53167
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution About 1927.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

High class land for food production South Island 2012

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6018
21
Added
09 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 09 Feb 2016.

"This data identified areas in the North Island that have been classified as being the most productive for growing food. It supports most crops across New Zealand. Expanding lifestyle blocks and urban areas reduce the availability of high-class land for commercial crop growing, and this land is unlikely to be returned to primary production. This affects our commercial food-production capacity.

This data set relates to the "High-class land for food production" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website."

Layer ID 52831
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution 100.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual sea surface temperature difference from normal, 1995

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6131
1
Added
12 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Feb 2016.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. Some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.

This layer shows annual sea-surface temperature difference from normal for 1995 as part of the data series for years 1993 to 2013. "Normal" is defined as the average sea-surface temperature for 1993–2013.

NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately 6-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom and Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.

This dataset relates to the "Annual average sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: grid

Unit: percent

Further information can be found in:

Uddstrom, MJ (2003). Lessons from high-resolution satellite SSTs. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 84(7), 896–897.

Uddstrom, MJ, & Oien, NA (1999). On the use of high resolution satellite data to describe the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface temperatures in the New Zealand region. Journal of Geophysical Research (Oceans) 104, chapter 9, 20729–20751.

Layer ID 53165
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution About 1927.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual mean sea level (relative to land) (1900–2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5803
158
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Sea-level rise is a consequence of climate change. Increases in global temperature cause ocean waters to expand, and glaciers and ice sheets to melt into oceans. Sea-level rise affects estuaries, coastal wetlands, and intertidal and sub-tidal habitats and species. The increased likelihood of coastal erosion from sea-level rise presents a risk for seaside communities and their infrastructure, and for the marine environment itself, from increased suspended sediments.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal sea-level rise" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52523
Data type Table
Row count 575
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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