Natural river flow statistics, predicted for all river reaches

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1737
151
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

River flow is the quantity of water passing a point over a certain time. Each river or stream has its own natural flow characteristics, such as peak flows following rain or high spring flows from snow melt. Overall, this affects how much water is available for irrigation, drinking water, hydroelectricity generation, and recreational activities. River flows also influence a waterway’s physical form, habitat, and ecological processes like migration, spawning, and food supply for aquatic life.

This dataset relates to the "The geographic pattern of river flows" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52536
Data type Table
Row count 570579
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Monthly average peak UV index value, 1981–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1780
8
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Monthly average peak UV index values at Invercargill, Lauder (Otago region), Christchurch, Paraparaumu (Wellington region), and Leigh (Auckland region). The strength of UV light is expressed as a solar UV index, starting from 0 (no UV) to 11+ (extreme).
Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light helps our bodies make vitamin D, which we need for healthy bones and muscles. However, too much exposure to UV light can cause skin cancer. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, and monitoring UV levels helps us understand the occurrence of skin cancer.
Ozone in the upper atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s UV light, protecting us from harmful levels. The amount of UV radiation reaching the ground varies in relation to changes in the atmospheric ozone concentrations. The Antarctic ozone hole lies well to the south of New Zealand and does not have a large effect on New Zealand’s ozone concentrations.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89467
Data type Table
Row count 65
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

River Environment Classification User Guide (2010)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1451
299
Updated
02 Mar 2015

This item was last updated on MfE Data Service on 02 Mar 2015

160
Document ID11123
File nameriver-environment-classification-user-guide-2010.pdf
TypePDF
Size5.25 MB

Soil moisture PED annual average 1972-2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1708
42
Added
18 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Feb 2016.

Soil moisture is important for plant growth. A lack of moisture content over a growing season is a good indicator of drought, which can have social, environmental, and economic impacts. Increasing temperatures and changes in rainfall patterns are expected to increase the frequency and intensity of drought in many regions. Growing season soil moisture deficits are estimated by the potential evapotranspiration deficit, the difference between rainfall and evapotranspiration.

This dataset shows annual average soil moisture (potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED)) across New Zealand for years 1972 to 2014.

Evapotranspiration is the loss of water by evaporation and plant transpiration. PED is the difference between estimated evapotranspiration and rainfall.

We produced maps of the annual PED total (in millimetres) for every growing season (calculated as July–June years) from 1972 to 2013. Care should be taken when comparing maps from year to year – days may be missing from the PED GIS data, and data may have been interpolated to complete the dataset. The interpolation accuracy is lowest in areas of high elevation, where there are fewer climate stations and complex terrain affects accuracy. Climate stations may also open and close, affecting the accuracy of the data provided.

This dataset relates to the "Soil moisture and drought" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: raster catalogue
Unit: mm/yr

Layer ID 53315
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Land Environments New Zealand (LENZ) - Level 1 Grid (2010)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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1711
25
Added
23 Dec 2013

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 23 Dec 2013.

Land Environments of New Zealand (LENZ) is a classification of fifteen climate, landform, and soil variables chosen for their relevance to biological distributions. Classification groups were derived by automatic classification using a multivariate procedure. Four levels of classification detail have been produced from this analysis, containing 20, 100, 200, and 500 groups respectively.
More information is available from the LENZ web site:
www.landcareresearch.co.nz/databases/lenz/

Layer ID 51800
Data type Grid
Resolution 100.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Current wetland extent, 2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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1608
119
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Wetlands support unique biodiversity and provide important services. They clean water of nutrients and sediment, help dampen floods, provide habitat, and act as carbon sinks. They are also valued for their spiritual and cultural significance and as important sources of food and materials, such as flax. Draining them for agricultural and urban development has reduced their extent. Understanding this reduction provides insight into the loss of biodiversity and natural function.
This dataset relates to the ""Wetland extent"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52676
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 45847
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

River Environment Classification Canterbury (2010)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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1566
96
Added
23 Dec 2013

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 23 Dec 2013.

The New Zealand River Environment Classification (REC) organises information about the physical characteristics of New Zealand's rivers. Individual river sections are mapped according to physical factors such as climate, source of flow for the river water, topography, and geology, and catchment land cover eg, forest, pasture or urban. Sections of river that have similar ecological characteristics can then be grouped together, no matter where they are.

This information is mapped for New Zealand's entire river network - over 425,000 kilometres of river. Different types of rivers respond differently to the pressures placed on them - the REC can be used to highlight the most appropriate management tools and approaches to reduce these pressures for each river type. Information from the classification is used to develop policy, assess the environment, and report on the quality of river water.

Stream order is the numerical position of a tributary or section of a river within the entire network. Headwater streams are assigned a stream order of 1. When two tributaries of the same stream order meet, the order increments by one for the next section downstream. However, if two sections meet where one section has higher order than the other, the next section downstream has the same order as the highest upstream section.

Additional metadata can be found at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/ser/metadata/env-clas... .

Layer ID 51853
Data type Vector linestring
Feature count 94350
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

NZ Coastal Hydrosystems

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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1569
42
Added
02 Feb 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 02 Feb 2017.

Coastal hydrosystems describe coastal features that span a gradient from near coast freshwater lakes/wetlands (lacustrine/palustrine environments) to marine. The term 'coastal hydrosystem' avoids the common error of referring to all such features as estuaries, mislabelling the numerous types that are non-estuarine and have different behavioural characteristics and management sensitivities from any truly estuarine environment. It also encompasses the coastal systems that do not represent end-of-river environments (e.g., some pocket beaches and embayments) or are so large and complex as to be fed by several freshwater drainage features (rivers, streams, wetlands) but which are dominated by none (e.g., some harbours, fjords, sounds and coastal-lacustrine systems). It also incorporates the multiple aspects of each system, including beaches, spits, barriers, river mouths, wetlands, saltmarshes and other geomorphic, ecological and hydrological features.

The New Zealand Coastal Hydrosystem classification (NZCH) is a classification of coastal hydrosystems within New Zealand including some offshore islands. The coastal hydrosystems classification is based on a hierarchical view of the abiotic components that comprise the environments of coastal hydrosystems. This classification presents detail at the geomorphic class level because this level is particularly important for coastal management and conservation needs at national and regional scales.

The primary GIS is the point layer. Supporting files (attached) include: a CSV database of environmental variables; GIS polygon layer; and Google Earth (.kmz) point and polygon exports.

The database, GIS and Google Earth files should be used in conjunction with the Classification of New Zealand's Coastal Hydrosystems report (Hume et al. 2016) (also attached) which documents a full description of the database, the calculation procedures and limitations to the variables.

The spreadsheet comprises a database of 500 New Zealand coastal hydrosystems and their associated environmental variables developed for the report.

The GIS point file comprises 500 New Zealand coastal hydrosystems and their associated environmental variables developed for the database. The environmental variables are mapped at 1:50,000 scale.

NOTE: Within the point attribute file -9999 represents the environmental variables with no data as shown in the spreadsheet as a blank cell. Make sure to exclude these values from analyses.

The polygon files comprise 420 New Zealand coastal hydrosystems depicting their general shape of the water body basin at high tide and upstream limit.

The .kmz files are derived from the NZCH GIS point and polygon layers for use with Google Earth.

The report provides a classification of coastal hydrosystems within New Zealand including some offshore islands. The coastal hydrosystems classification reconciles and clarifies coastal hydrosystem terminology and produces a hierarchy and classification of coastal wetland, riverine, estuarine and marine types. This report identifies and provides a list of environmental variables that describe the characteristics and properties of about 500 discrete coastal hydrosystems that can be used to provide national and regional statistics on coastal hydrosystems. An Identification Key is provided to guide the determination of the classes.

Layer ID 53565
Data type Vector point
Feature count 500
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrogen leached from soil, total, 1990-2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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1510
68
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth. It occurs naturally in the environment but is added in agricultural processes (typically as fertiliser) to boost production. Although much of the applied nitrogen is taken up by plants, livestock waste returns a considerable amount to the soil. Nitrate formed from this waste easily drains (leaches) from the soil before plants can absorb it, and it can enter waterways, potentially harming ecosystems.

This dataset relates to the "Trends in nitrogen leaching from agricultural activities" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52530
Data type Table
Row count 138
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand's greenhouse gas emissions (1990–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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1538
32
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are small compared with those of other developed nations, but we have committed to being part of the global response to climate change. New Zealand's greenhouse gas inventory is an annual report on all of the country’s human-induced GHG emissions and removals of GHG emissions. The inventory is produced as part of our obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol.
Some GHG emissions are removed, primarily by forests. Net emissions represent the total amount of gas contributed to the atmosphere but gross emmissions are also provided for New Zealand.
This dataset relates to the "New Zealand's greenhouse gas emissions" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52565
Data type Table
Row count 24
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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